SPCM 1 Guidelines in Making Speech Plan - Guidelines in...

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Unformatted text preview: Guidelines in Making Speech Plan General Guidelines 1. Speech plans must be typewritten on a short bond paper using the following format: Calibri, 11, 1.25 spacing, 1x1 margin on all sides. Don’t forget to put your name, subject and section, and date of submission at the upper left portion of the first page of the speech plan. Make sure your pages are paginated from the first page to the last. 2. The speech plans must not exceed three pages each. 3. Speech plans should only be on the topics approved and not on any other topic. Should you need to change your topic/s, notify me first. Changing of topics is allowed only before the set deadlines for the passing of the speech plans. 4. Your speech plans should follow the three-­‐level sentence outline format; meaning, your outlines must not exceed or be less than three levels (i.e. I-­‐, A-­‐, 1-­‐), and there should only be one and complete sentence per item, no paragraphs. Make your sentences simple. 5. Make sure you know the proper symbol system (i.e. you have roman numerals first (first level), then capital letters (second level), then Arabic numbers (third and last level). Example: I. Lksdjflkjg A. Kjfhslkfg 1. lkdsjfgs;g 2. klgkfg B. skldfjlksg 1. lkfjkgj 2. lkdjgdfg II. slkdfjslkgj A. slkdfj;rg B. slkdfjlkg) Make sure you have at least two sub-­‐topics per item except for the items in the last level of the outline. 6. Don’t forget to provide a title for each speech plan. 7. You must have at least three references for each of your speech plan. Internet sources, as long as credible, are allowed. Have at least one book reference as much as possible. 8. Follow the APA format in listing your references. Example: 1. for book sources Author’s surname, initials. (year of publication). Title of the book in sentence case. Publisher: City of Publication. Castillo, L.M. (2010). The politics of poverty. UP Press: Quezon City. 1 2. for internet sources Author’s surname, initials. (year of publication). Title of the article in sentence case. Title of Page in Title Case. Retrieved (date of page retrieval) from (complete URL). Garinga, L. (2010). How to be grade-­‐conscious. Libbypretty: The Best Internet Page. Retrieved November 10, 2010 from . Informative Speech Plan Specific Guidelines 1. Think of a creative title. 2. Be very specific with your SPECIFIC SPEECH PURPOSE. 3. Make your thesis statement concise. Remember that a thesis statement is a one-­‐sentence statement of the controlling idea of your speech that determines what should and what shouldn’t be part of your speech. It must not be composed of more than one sentence, or a phrase. Again, it must be one and complete sentence. 4. You may have several sentences for your attention step to briefly explain what you plan to do with it. 5. Remember that your informative speech plan has nine parts: 1) title, 2) specific speech purpose, 3) thesis statement, 4) attention step, 5) clarification step, 6) body, 7) summary step, 8) action step and 9) references. Persuasive Speech Plan Specific Guidelines 1. Think of a creative title. 2. Be very specific with your SPECIFIC SPEECH PURPOSE. 3. Make your proposition/claim concise. Remember that a proposition/claim is a one-­‐sentence statement of the controlling idea of your speech. It must not be composed of more than one sentence, or a phrase. Again, it must be one and complete sentence. 4. The need step must contain the pressing problems we have today because of not having your proposed action. Use real-­‐life examples to show the need. 5. In the satisfaction step, you present the what’s and how’s of your proposed action. 6. In the visualization step, present the positive effects of adopting your suggested course of action. 7. Remember that your persuasive speech plan has ten parts: 1) title, 2) specific speech purpose, 3) proposition/claim, 4) attention step, 5) need step, 6) satisfaction step, 7) visualization step, 8) action step, 9) visual aids, and references. 2 ...
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