motivated sequence handouts (1) - Monroe's Motivated...

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Monroe's Motivated Sequence (MMS) This is an organizational pattern used to develop a sense of want or need in the audience, satisfy that want or need, and to help the audience get enthused about the advantages of that solution. Need versus Want --A need is something that fills a significant, life impacting void. For example, we need food, water, shelter. We need money to secure our needs. We need other people. --A want, on the other hand, is something we would like to have, but does not impact our lives in a significant way. An Ipod may be nice to have, but it does not impact our lives in significant ways. Why is this distinction important? Knowing whether to build a need or want tells you what your focus of the speech is going to be. If your persuasive goal is to fulfill a want, and you present it as if it were fulfilling a need, your audience may be offended. If, on the other hand, you sell a need as a want, you may miss some strong persuasive appeals. Thus, you need to determine and adhere to what kind of appeal you are going to build--a need or a want. MONROE'S MOTIVATED SEQUENCE--THE FIVE STEPS (ANSVA) Step 1: Get Attention -- Through the use of attention getting devices, you will aim to do two basic things: get the audience's attention, and ease the audience into the topic. Step 2: Build the Need/Want-- In this step, you will work to get your audience to feel a need or want, whichever you determine to be appropriate. This is accomplished via four steps: A. Statement: give a definite, concise statement of what the need or want is. B. Illustration: give one or more examples illustrating the need or want. This is where you try to "paint pictures" verbally to really get audience to feel that need or want. C. Ramification : here you can offer additional evidence, such as statistics/testimony/examples which give even more weight to the need or want. D. Pointing: this is where you really point out how this need or want is directly related and important to the audience. Step 3: Satisfy the Need/Want- - In this step, you will now fill the need/want you built in step 2. It is vital that you be consistent; i.e., be sure the
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solution you offer really does fit the need/want. There are five steps here : A. Statement : tell your audience in a very specific, direct sentence what it is you want them to do (THIS IS THE FIRST TIME WE WILL HAVE HEARD--PRECISELY--WHAT IT IS YOU ARE ADVOCATING) B. Explanation : Explain what exactly it is you are advocating. C. Theoretical Demonstraton : This is where you make it clear how what you are advocating fulfills the need you built in step 2. D. Reference to Practical Experience : This is where you bring in external evidence supporting the value of your proposal. E. Meeting Objections : here you anticipate counter-arguments and you pre-empt them, i.e., address them before the audience has time to actually bring them up.
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  • Spring '16
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