Chapter1-part2 - Chapter 1 roadmap 1.1 What is the Internet...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 1: roadmap 1.1 What is the Internet? 1.2 Network edge v end systems, access networks, links 1.3 Network core v circuit switching, packet switching v hierarchical Internet structure 1.4 Performance: v delay, loss and throughput 1.5 Protocol layers, service models 1.6 Networks under attack: security 1.7 History Introduction 1-45
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction q mesh of interconnected routers The network core 1-46 Source Destination Router 1 Router n ….
Image of page 2
Internet Design Principles 1. Packet vs Circuit Switching (BC 6 or KR 1.3) 2. Hierarchy: Network of Networks ( BC 6 or KR 1.3) 3. Layered Architecture (BC 7 or KR 1.5) Through a Historical Perspective (or KR 1.7) “Networks Illustrated: Principles without Calculus” by Brinton & Chiang Book: Coursera:
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Sharing Resources q FDMA, TDMA, CDMA v Circuit-switched : Dedicate / assign network resources v Negative – Not all resources used constantly! q Paradigm shift v Packet-switched : Let everyone share the resources q Session v Application-level v Unicast : One source, one dest.
Image of page 4
Circuit Switching Advantage q Debate runs far and deep 1. Guarantee of Quality q Circuit Switching v Each session has a dedicated circuit v Throughput and delay performance will not change ! q Packet Switching v Best-effort service : no guarantees (“NO effort) v Links get congested, messages arrive out of order, …
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Packet Switching Advantages 2. Ease of Connectivity v No need to allocate resources first v Transmit at will , as long as protocols are followed 3. Scalability v Large number of diverse sessions v Obtained through high efficiency v (1) Statistical multiplexing v (2) Resource pooling
Image of page 6
Packet Switching Advantages q Statistical multiplexing v Multiple sessions can share one path q Resource pooling v One session can use multiple paths q No wasted/idle network resources through reservations
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Packet vs. Circuit Switching q In the end, packet switching won the day q Not clear until early 2000s q Scalability first , then search for other quality control solutions
Image of page 8
Introduction Packet Switching: queueing , delay, loss A B C R = 100 Mb/s R = 1.5 Mb/s D E queue of packets waiting for output link 1-53 queuing and loss: v If arrival rate (in bits) to link exceeds transmission rate of link for a period of time: § packets will queue, wait to be transmitted on link § packets can be dropped (lost) if memory (buffer) fills up
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
v Each end-end data stream is divided into packets v Store-and-forward : node receives complete packet then forwards v user A, B packets share network resources – no reservations – packets can be delayed or dropped v each packet uses full link bandwidth v bandwidth shared on demand, as needed: statistical multiplexing .
Image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern