HSC4600CaseStudy - Running Head HURRICANE KATRINA Case of...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Running Head: HURRICANE KATRINA 1 Case of Hurricane Katrina Justin Lucas, Lakhwinder Singh, Jonathan Teofilo CSU East Bay – Health Science 4600: Health Systems Management March 10, 2015
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Running Head: HURRICANE KATRINA 2 Situation Hurricane Katrina was one of the largest Hurricanes to hit the United States. Louisiana was hit by the Hurricane on August 28th, 2005. By August 29th, 2005, the city seemed to survive the Hurricane, but since water pressure was too strong, levee’s holding back the water broke and flooded 80% of the city. Hospitals were one of many places, which were targeted by the storm. Hospitals were not able to evacuate all their patients on time, which resulted in deaths of many patients. When asked by Ryan Balley, was a evacuation plan required during the storm, Dr. Anna Pou, a doctor at Memorial Medical Center reported that “at that time, evacuation plan did not appear to be of extreme importance, because rescue workers were expected to evacuate the entire hospital in a few hours”. (Ryan Balley, September 2010). Due to the storm, hospitals had no access to electricity, because backup generators had ran out of fuel, the first couple of floors and basements were flooded with water, interrupting reliable transportation. Hospital equipment, and facilities were either destroyed or sustained significant damage. There was a shortage in food supply, and the Hospitals lost their paperwork and patient reports. FEMA had created a plan in response to a potential major hurricane in New Orleans, during the 1990’s. FEMA Director, James Lee Witt stated that, FEMA would pre-deploy Ships, which would have hospital facilities on board, and pumps, which could pump all the water out of the city. (Mtuck, Hurricane Katrina). Before Hurricane Katrina, a Hospital’s first priority was to transfer its patients to a safer location by creating an evacuation plan, then have 1:1 matching of patients to available beds in the region, and lastly have backup generators for electricity shortage. After Hurricane Katrina, there have been a few changes. The Hospital’s are now required to have full-scale interfaculty evacuation drills, and have better access to receiving and sending patients
Image of page 2
Running Head: HURRICANE KATRINA 3 out of the Hospital. Automated patient tracking is also being enforced through barcoded wristbands for identification purposes. Another aspect that is also being taken into consideration is training top personnel’s at Hospitals on how to plan a disaster preparedness program.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern