carpentry - Fourth Workshop Carpentry Figure 1 Natural Wood...

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Fourth Workshop: Carpentry Figure 1: Natural Wood
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Introduction: Carpentry is the processing wood and working on it by cutting it and shaping it to use it in buildings, ships and bridges. Wood types are divided into 2 major groups: 1. Natural wood 2. Manufactures woods Comparing natural and manufactured wood: Natural wood: it is available in the nature as trees. Wood is obtained by cutting trees and processing them to form timber. Timber is the start material used to make buildings. There are two sub-types of natural woods. These are softwoods and hardwoods. Softwoods: Produced by gymnosperms trees that produce seeds with no covering. These trees tend to be fast green and ever-growing trees. Softwoods are usually softer and easier to work with that hardwoods. Examples: pine, fir, cedar, hemlock… Hardwoods: Produced by angiosperm trees that produce seeds with some sort of covering. These trees tend to be slow growing and deciduous (they shed their leaves annually). Hardwoods are usually denser and harder than softwoods. So more expensive cutting tools are needed to cut them and shape them. An exception is balsa wood, because it is one of the lightest and least dense woods available, however it is still considered a hardwood. Hardwoods are very beautiful and usually knot- free. Examples: oak, maple, cherry, and poplar. Figure 2: Natural wood used to make a treasure box Figure 3: Natural wood used to make watches.
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Manufactured woods: These are man-made woods. There are different types of them: Plywood: It is the first manufactured wood that was used. It is made by bonding three layers of veneer using both heat and pressure. MDF: It has a smooth and even surface and can be easily painted. It can also be made fire resistant. Therefore it is often used in furniture. Blockboard: It combines two types of wood. It is often used in bedrooms and kitchens. It is used for heavy duty services. Hardboard: It is very cheap and is produced by mixing and pressing wood to form a sheet. It is used for light duty such as covering surfaces. Oriented Strand Board: Formed from layers of wood strands that are bonded together with moisture and heat resistant adhesives. Figure 4: Plywood Figure 6: MDF Figure 7: Blockboard Figure 8: Hardboard Figure 9: Oriented Strand Board
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Carpentry Tools: These tools are used to shape the wood piece and give it the required dimensions.
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