welding (2) - Second Workshop Welding Fig 1 Welding...

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Second Workshop: Welding Fig 1 Welding Animation
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Introduction Welding is the process by which two or more materials (usually metals or thermoplastics) are joined permanently. The ends of the two materials being joined are subjected to heat, pressure or a combination of both in order to melt them. Then a filler is placed between the two molten parts to form a weld pool that cools to become a strong permanent joint. Welding is usually an industrial process, however it can be performed in many different environments including open air, under water, and in outer space. It can be done both manually and automatically. This science continues to advance and flourish and today robot welding is commonly used in industries. Welding is a hazardous process and precautions are required to avoid burns, electric shocks, vision damage, inhalation of gases and fumes, and exposure to intense ultraviolet radiation. (Precautions are discussed in detail in the exercise steps) Energy Sources Used: Many different energy sources can be used to carry out the welding. These include: gas flame, electric arc, laser, electron beam, friction and ultrasound. Fig 2 Appropriate protection Fig 3 Hazard Sign
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Types of Welding: There are many types of welding and the processes can be classified according to the combination of pressure and temperature used in them. The table below shows the different welding types available. Table 1.0: Types of Welding Welding Type Subgroups Gas Welding Air-acetylene welding, Oxy-acetylene welding, Oxy- hydrogen welding, Pressure gas welding Arc Welding Carbon arc welding, TIG welding, MIG welding, Submerged arc welding, Shielded metal arc welding, Plasma arc welding, Flux cored arc welding, Stud arc welding, Electro slag welding Resistance Welding Spot welding, Steam welding, Percussion welding, High frequency welding, Projection welding, Resistance butt welding, Flash butt welding Solid State Welding Friction welding, Cold welding, Ultrasonic welding, Hot pressure welding, Diffusion welding Radiant Energy Welding Laser beam welding, Electron beam welding Thermo- Chemical Welding Thermite welding, Atomic welding The main types of welding used in industry and by home engineers are MIG welding, Arc welding, Gas welding, and TIG welding. However in the workshop only the first three types were carried out (MIG welding, Arc welding and Gas welding).
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1. Arc Welding: It is a type of welding that uses electrical energy to heat the base metals. Either direct current or indirect current can be used. Either consumable or non-consumable electrodes can be used.
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  • Spring '16
  • Arc welding

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