HWs - 1 Alexandra LeSaicherre CHE 2162 TOTAL 103 PTS...

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1 Alexandra LeSaicherre CHE 2162 9/9/15 Homework 3: Problem 1: single () – to change any vector X to single precision. double () – changes any vector X to double precision. str2num () – going from a string matrix to a numeric array. int32 () – takes an integer X and changes it to a signed 32-bit integer. uint16 () – takes an integer X and changes it to a signed 16-bit integer. intmin () – the smallest value an integer can have. dec2base () – takes a decimal based integer and converts it to a base B string. isequal () – numerically equal arrays. real () – intricate real part to X. imag () – intricate imaginary part to X. isreal () – if the array is real it is true. zeros (m) – an m-by-m matrix of zeros. ones (m) – an m-by-m matrix of ones. magic (m) – an m-by-m matrix made up of integers from 1 to m^2. length (A) – gives the length of a vector A. size (A) – gives the size of an array by columns and rows. reshape (A,m,n) – gives a m-by-n matrix taken from the A column. inv (A) – inverse of a square matrix. Problem 2: MfE Problem 3.22 on pg. 119 >> Zl=complex(0,5) Zl = 0.0000 + 5.0000i >> Zc=complex(0,-15) Zc =
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2 0.0 -15.0000i >> Zr=5+10j Zr = 5.0000 +10.0000i >> R=Zr-5+0j R = 0.0000 +10.0000i >> Zl+Zc+R ans = 0 >> Zt=0 Zt = 0 >> V=complex(10,0) V = 10.0000 + 0.0000i >> V/Zt ans = Inf Problem 3: MfE Problem 2.7 on pg. 56 >> P=220 P = 220 >> n=2 n = 2 >> V=1 V = 1 >> a=5.536
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3 a = 5.5360 >> b=0.03049 b = 0.0305 >> R=0.08314472 R = 0.0831 >> (((P+(((n^2)*a)/(V^2)))*(V-(n*b)))/(n*R)) ans = 1.3674e+03 Problem 4: a. Create a row vector variable named rv1 of 12 equally spaced elements in which the first element is 35 and the last element is 10. >> rv1=linspace(35,10,12) rv1 = Columns 1 through 8 35.0000 32.7273 30.4545 28.1818 25.9091 23.6364 21.3636 19.0909 Columns 9 through 12 16.8182 14.5455 12.2727 10.0000 b. Create a row vector rv2 of elements from 4 to 12 spaced by 0.5. >> rv2=[4:0.5:12] rv2 = Columns 1 through 8 4.0000 4.5000 5.0000 5.5000 6.0000 6.5000 7.0000 7.5000 Columns 9 through 16 8.0000 8.5000 9.0000 9.5000 10.0000 10.5000 11.0000 11.5000 Column 17 12.0000 c. Create a row vector rv3 of elements from 4 to 12 spaced by 2.5.
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4 >> rv3=[4:2.5:12] rv3 = 4.0000 6.5000 9.0000 11.5000 d. What do you notice about the vectors rv2 and rv3? How are they different? Do you think this is calculated correctly? What will you have to be careful of when using this vector definition method? --- What I noticed about the vectors rv2 and rv3 was how rv2 went all the way to 12 and had more numbers in between 4 and 12, so it was more precise. While for rv3 the spacing did not allow it to go all the way to 12. I think they are calculated correctly but because of the spacing of rv3 it did not give me the number I needed. I will have to be careful when using this by making sure that the spacing I choose will still give me the number I want to end with. Problem 5: Create a vector, named Cfirst, in which the first element is 4, the increment is 3 and the last element is 58. Then using the colon symbols, create a new vector, named Csecond, that has six elements. The first three elements are the first three elements of the vector Cfirst, and the last three are the last three elements of Cfirst.
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  • Fall '14
  • shelton
  • Vector Motors, Alexandra LeSaicherre

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