Assaignment 4 - RUNNINGHEAD Color Blindness Tanner...

Info icon This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

RUNNINGHEAD: Color Blindness Tanner Navarrette Color Blindness comes in different degrees and variations. In our eyes we have two types of photoreceptors. The two types of photoreceptors are cone and rod receptors. Rods are more abundant in our eyes, while cones are used to pick up what we perceive to be color. In weakly illuminated rooms we may even see color photos as grayscale because only rod photoreceptors would be active in such low light. The eyes are merely channels in which the brain gets information to process and turn into the picture we see. Color blindness is only present in a small part of the population as a whole. The most common forms of color blindness result from alterations in light-detecting molecules present in cone photoreceptors or in the cones themselves. Most people are trichromats, meaning they are
Image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: able to see and process all three normal photopigments. People that have these types of color blindness are either dichromats or monochromats. There are different types of dichromacy. Deuteranamoly is the most common of these, dueteranomoly is the inability to differentiate between reds and greens. People suffering from this see both colors as a yellowish brown color. Dueteranamoly is more commonly referred to as: red-green blindness. People with color blindess can live a normal and fruitful life. Some things like driving and following signs may be a little more difficult and take some practice. Often people suffering from color blindness will remember the pattern of lights at a stop light to know when to slow, go, and stop....
View Full Document

  • Spring '14
  • Psychology, Photoreceptor cell, Color blindness, Tanner Navarrette

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern