14-Amortized Analysis and Examples

14-Amortized Analysis and Examples - Amortized Analysis...

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Amortized Analysis Consider a sequence of operations on a data structure and let t i be the cost of the ith operation. An amortized analysis means determining the worst case cost of the sequence. The amortized cost is the worst case cost of the sequence divided by the length of the sequence. Example 1: Binary counter implemented as an array of size k. One operation - increment the counter by 1. We take the cost of an increment to be the number of bits that change. The counter starts at 0. Take k =8. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 etc It takes 1+ floor(lg i) bits to represent the number i and so no more than this many bits can change when the counter is incremented from i-1 to i. Thus the total cost of n increments will be at most the sum of {1+floor(lg i)} from i=1 to n. But this is O(nlgn). This is a worst case analysis and leads to a bound but this bound can be improved. So the amortized cost is lgn. Aggregate approach - Try to actually add up the costs of a sequence. Here, we see that the 0 th bit changes every time we increment, bit 1 changes the floor(n/2) times, bit 2 changes the floor(n/4) times and in general bit i changes the floor(n/2 i ) times Hence the total cost of n increments = sum of floor(n/2 i ) from i=1 to n. But this is less than the sum of n/2 i over all i> 1 which is 2n. Hence we say the amortized cost of an increment is 2. Potential approach .- assign a “potential”, a number, say Φ(S), to each state S of the data structure. Then we define the amortized cost of the ith operation, a i , by
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a i = t i + Φ(S i ) - Φ(S i-1 ) where S i , i>0, denotes the state of the data structure after the ith operation and S 0 denotes the initial state. Then, ∑a i = ∑t i + ∑ {Φ(S i ) - Φ(S i-1 )} where the sum is over the sequence of n operations. Notice that this becomes ∑a i = ∑t i + Φ(S f ) - Φ(S 0 ) or ∑t i = ∑a i + {Φ(S 0 ) - Φ(S f )} or ∑a i - {Φ(S f ) - Φ(S 0 )}. This means that whenever the final potential Φ(S f ) exceeds the initial potential Φ(S 0 ), the sum of the a i , ∑a i , is a bound on the total cost. Otherwise, to achieve a bound, requires that a bound for Φ(S 0 ) - Φ(S f ) must to be added to ∑a i to achieve a bound on, ∑t i , the total cost. For our counter example, take the potential to be the number of 1’s in the counter. Then, the amortized cost of an increment is the actual cost 1 plus the change in potential due to the increment. This gives the following table for our example: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 t i Φ a i ∑t i ∑a i 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 3 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 4 6 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 7 8 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 8 10 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 10 12 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 2 11 14 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 1 2 15 16 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 16 18 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
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  • Fall '16
  • James Korsh
  • Analysis of algorithms, Splay Theorem

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