20.EAPS327_federal_policy_economics(1)

20.EAPS327_federal_policy_economics(1) - EAPS327 Apr 5 2016...

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EAPS327 – Apr 5, 2016 Remaining class schedule This week: Tues Apr 5: Federal and state climate policies and economics Thurs Apr 7: International climate policy and ethics Next week: Tues Apr 12: group work day (in this room) Wed Apr 13: bonus movie evening (6:30-8:30) Thurs Apr 14: 1 st day of group presentations Last 2 weeks of class: group presentations Policy brief papers due Friday April 22 Last day of class is Apr 28 no final exam Future sections of EAPS327 Fall 2016 it will be taught by Dr. Huber – it might be different I’ll teach it again in Spring 2017 1
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Bonus (+1% on final grade) movie event: “Merchants of Doubt” Wed Apr 13, 6:30-8:30pm, HAMP 2201 2
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Focus questions (these will not be collected) Federal climate policy 1. What is the US doing to reduce GHG emissions? 2. How ambitious is the plan? Economics of climate policy 3. Is climate change too expensive to solve? 4. Is climate change too expensive NOT to solve? 5. Is this an opportunity for economic growth? 3
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The U.S. Clean Power Plan 4 Released in October 2015
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Obama’s Clean Power Plan Goal: Reduce CO 2 emissions from electricity generation by 32% from 2005 levels by the year 2030 1. How did Obama come to the conclusion that action is needed? 2. Why target this sector of the energy market? 3. Why this goal? 4. What impacts will it have? 5. Why do some people disagree with this action? 5
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1. How did Obama come to the conclusion that action is needed? Well, there is that “scientific consensus” thing… What reason(s) do you think he found most compelling? 6
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2. Why target this sector? 7
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EPA’s “building blocks” to reduce emissions Targets the carbon efficiency of energy production. 1. Make coal-fired power plants more efficient; 2. Shift generation from existing fossil steam plants to existing natural gas combined cycle plants (NGCC) up to a maximum utilization of 75 percent; and 3. Use more zero-emission renewable power, including onshore wind, utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP), geothermal and hydropower. •. Note: reducing consumer demand (or the energy efficiency of the economy) does NOT factor into these targets. 8
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Why do the renewables have CO 2 eq emissions Greater than zero? 9 75% 50% 100%
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Carbon intensity of different fuels depends on chemistry 10 Fuel Type Energy content (kJ/g) H/C ratio Coal 39.3 1/1 Liquid Oil 43.6 2/1 Natural gas 51.6 4/1 Biofuel 27.3 Values from Keeling (1988) Coal Methane (CH 4 )
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A brief history of natural gas use For years, natural gas (or methane) was a waste product of oil drilling. Either burned or pumped back below ground to enhance oil production Needed pipelines for transport (which were expensive) Push for cleaner energy and higher oil prices has made natural gas more widely used.
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