9 Carbon Cycle - Carbon Cycle Pages 35-37 Discussion What...

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Carbon Cycle Pages 35-37
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Discussion What do you know about global CO 2 levels? Are they increasing, decreasing, or staying the same? What processes impact these levels? What impacts do CO 2 levels have on global temperature/climate? What are/would be the impacts of climate change?
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Discussion In groups, discuss the following: What data would you need to investigate these questions? How do you determine if a data source is reliable?
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Carbon Cycle: Introduction Sources of Carbon CO 2 atmosphere C 6 H 12 O 6 organisms H 2 CO 3 ocean CH 4 animal matter CaCO 3 organisms Biogeochemical cycle by which carbon is exchanged between the biosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth.
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****The Carbon Cycle**** ATMOSPHERE (+ Aquatic) BIOLOGICAL Animals Plants GEOLOGICAL Cellular Respiration: releases CO 2 into atmosphere Cellular Respiration Photosynthesis: uses CO 2 to produce organic carbon Materials that do not decay yield fossil fuels (i.e. oil, coal, natural gas, peat). Fossil fuels are considered “fixed” carbon and not usually considered part of the natural carbon cycle (that is… until we burn them) Burning fossil fuels (i.e. combustion) releases carbon back into the atmosphere Buried organisms that do not decay (sources of carbon) Decaying organisms release CO2 (or methane) back into the atmosphere
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Carbon Cycle The most important feature of the carbon cycle is the circulation of carbon from the abiotic environment into the living things ( biotic ) and back into the abiotic environment. PROCESSES: Photosynthesis: Abiotic biotic environment Cellular Respiration: Biotic abiotic environment
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Photosynthesis Photosynthesis: Requires CO 2 and produces O 2 Removes carbon from the abiotic environment and restores carbon to the biotic environment Examples: plants, cyanobacteria, algae 6H 2 O + 6CO 2 ----------> C 6 H 12 O 6 (sugar) + 6O 2 sunlight
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Cellular Respiration Requires O 2 and produces CO 2 Carbon is removed from the biotic environment and restored to the abiotic environment.
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