24_fit_data_and_mttfmtbf - MLCC Application Notes FIT Data...

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December 2009 ───────────────────────────────────────────────┤├─ MLCC Application Notes FIT Data and MTTF/MTBF Frequently asked questions regarding TDK’s Failure in Time calculations and Mean Time To Failure / Mean Time Between Failure for capacitors. JimE Trinh and Dan Ly TDK Components USA, Inc. Abstract Oftentimes, when engineers choose a component for a system they are building, they need to know the Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) of a component in order to predict how reliable the whole system will be. This paper will address what MTBF, MTTF and FIT mean as they relate to electronic products and how TDK calculates them. We will also look at some of the misconceptions about MTBF, the importance of MTBF, and how it is used to calculate Availability.
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December 2009 MLCC Application Notes Mean Time between Failure and Reliability Calculations By JimE Trinh and Dan Ly TDK Components USA, Inc. In today’s fast paced world of ever-changing electronic devices and gadgets, design engineers are faced with many choices when choosing components for their next greatest and latest applications. Often, many factors dictate how an engineer will choose which component and what module to use in their system - for example: pricing, product life, operating condition, quality, reliability, etc. The latter factor, reliability, is one of the factors that will always be included when choosing a component because no consumer wants to pay for something that does not work the way it is supposed to shortly after it is purchased. The most common way to determine reliability, or failure in time (FIT) rate of a device, is mean time between failure (MTBF). This paper will address how MTBF is used as a tool to predict the rate at which failures can be expected for a particular component, as well as for the system as a whole, and how TDK provides this data to the customer. Q1. What is Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF)? A1. Mean time between failure is the arithmetic mean (or average) time between failures of a given device or system and is normally measured in hours. This statistical value is meant to represent the average amount of time that will pass between random failures for a large sample over a long period of time for a given component. It is also an indicator of system reliability that is calculated from known failure rates of various components in the system. [3,4,5] MTBF calculations are used to predict behaviors for a large (or entire) population, not the behavior from a particular site or smaller subset of the population. Therefore MTBF only applies to the cumulative analysis of large numbers of components; it says nothing about a particular unit.
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