Ed Slides Fall 2015 no pix - Does Education Provide...

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Does Education Provide Equality of Opportunity? Functionalist vs. Marxist Theories of Educational Stratification
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Agenda: Thinking About Education What do you/we want from education? Is the current set-up the best way to get it? The conventional wisdom on education Conflict vs. consensus paradigms: 2 ways of thinking about education Mid-quarter feedback
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ICWA: Series of Questions Why are you here? Is the set-up at the UW the best way of meeting your goals? What do we as a society want from our education system? Is the current set-up the best way to accomplish those goals?
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George HW Bush: “For me, education is the great lifting mechanism of an egalitarian society. It represents our most proven pathway to a better life.” Assumes: 1. Meritocracy 2. Ed = key
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Credential Inflation (Source: Ruane & Cerulo)
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Two Competing Paradigms: Consensus vs. Conflict A paradigm is a school of thought, that includes a group of theories all sharing the same general perspective or world view. Consensus paradigm : Society is a system whose parts normally work together for the good of all. Conflict paradigm : Society is an arena where groups with competing interests battle for dominance. These interests are based on class, race, gender, religion, nationality, ideology, etc.
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Consensus vs. Conflict Paradigms The consensus paradigm includes: Functionalist theory Neoclassical economic theory Human capital theory Modernization theory …etc. The conflict paradigm includes: Marxist theory Weberian theory World system theory Feminist theory …etc.
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Mid-quarter Feedback What’s working well? Do you need anything you’re not getting? Do you have suggestions for improvements? Please comment on: Lecture Quiz section Service learning
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The Functionalist Theory of Education A Consensus Theory
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Agenda: Functionalist Theory of Education The “organismic” analogy Manifest & latent functions of education Durkheim & the functions of education Davis & Moore’s theory of ed strat Critique D&M Readings: Davis & Moore, Tumin
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Education &Equality of Opportunity: The Functionalist Approach Functionalism: Emile Durkheim (1858-1917) The “organismic analogy”: Society is like an organism, and each part has its function. The goal: equilibrium
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Manifest & Latent Functions Latent functions: “Unintended, unrecognized consequences of a social pattern” Manifest functions: “Intended, obvious consequences of a social pattern”
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The functions of education: For individuals : to give people the skills & attitudes they need to be productive members of a democratic society For society : to sort people according to their talents & abilities; to put the most talented people into the most important positions
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Kingsley Davis (1908-1997) & Wilbert Moore (1914-1987)
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Functionalist Theory of Stratification & Education (Davis & Moore 1945) 1. Certain positions in any society are functionally more important than others, and require special skills to fill them.
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