Evidence_Based_Nurse_Driven_Interventions_for_the.5

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See discussions, stats, and author profiles for this publication at: Evidence-Based Nurse-Driven Interventions for the Care of Newborns With Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome ARTICLE in ADVANCES IN NEONATAL CARE · JULY 2014 DOI: 10.1097/ANC.0000000000000118 · Source: PubMed DOWNLOADS 46 VIEWS 245 2 AUTHORS , INCLUDING: Tammy Casper Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical … 4 PUBLICATIONS 2 CITATIONS SEE PROFILE Available from: Tammy Casper Retrieved on: 14 September 2015
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376 Advances in Neonatal Care • Vol. 14, No. 6 • pp. 376-380 Foundations in Newborn Care Section Editor Linda Ikuta, RN, MN, CCNS, PHN N eonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is a set of drug withdrawal symptoms that can affect the central nervous system and gastrointesti- nal and respiratory systems in the newborn when separated from the placenta at birth. 1 It occurs in 55% to 94% of neonates born to women who use opioid drugs during pregnancy. 1 , 2 In addition to opi- oid use, maternal use of benzodiazepines, barbitu- rates, and alcohol can also cause NAS. 3 Maternal smoking compounds the effects of these drugs on the newborn. 4 It is complicated to care for infants with NAS. Staff nurses must provide evidence-based care and incorporate clinical expertise to improve the health status of the maternal-infant dyad. The care occurs while the newborn experiences withdrawal in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), supported by caregivers and parents. In addition to the physical demands of these newborns, NICU nurses often experience a range of emotions, sometimes negative, related to maternal drug use and NAS throughout the infant’s hospital stay. 5 This complex healthcare concern requires education and an interdisciplinary approach to optimize neonatal outcomes. Multiple research articles describe management of NAS, including pharmacologic treatments. 2 , 6 , 7 The evi- dence for nursing interventions, however, lacks rigor Evidence-Based Nurse-Driven Interventions for the Care of Newborns With Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Tammy Casper, DNP, MEd; Megan Arbour, PhD, CNM DOI: 10.1097/ANC.0000000000000118 Author Affiliations: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (Dr Casper) and College of Nursing, University of Cincinnati (Drs Casper and Arbour), Ohio. The work occurred at the neonatal intensive care unit of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Ohio. The authors declare no conflict of interest. Correspondence: Tammy Casper, DNP, MEd, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, MLC 1013, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45229 ([email protected] cchmc.org). Copyright © 2014 by The National Association of Neonatal Nurses ABSTRACT Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is a growing problem in the United States, related to increased maternal substance use and abuse, and a set of drug withdrawal symptoms that can affect the central nervous system and gastrointestinal and respiratory systems in the newborn when separated from the placenta at birth. Infants with NAS often require a significant length of stay in the neonatal inten- sive care unit (NICU). Pharmacologic treatments and physician-directed interventions are well
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