Annotated+Bibliography_02_09_2014 NCU

Annotated+Bibliography_02_09_2014 NCU - Annotated...

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Annotated Bibliography 1 Annotated Bibliography Northcentral University Industrial Psychology and Organizational Behavior February 9, 2014
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Annotated Bibliography 2 Bönigk, M., & Steffgen, G. (2013). Effects of Habitual Anger on Employees' Behavior during Organizational Change. International Journal Of Environmental Research And Public Health , 10 (12), 6215-6234. doi:10.3390/ijerph10126215 The researchers in this article address employee anger resulting from organizational change, the influence of those reactions on employee behavior and whether such behaviors are conducive to successful organizational changes. The researchers surveyed employees representing assorted organizations in Luxembourg, Germany undergoing organizational change. The researchers sent an open survey business e-mail network to employees undergoing an organizational change in four companies. The researchers hypothesized, that those individuals who display a tendency to vent anger; e.g., men and subordinate workers, are more likely to demonstrate dysfunctional change habits. Within most organizations, such behaviors are considered as deviant from cultural norms and such behaviors should be eliminated. Findings indicate that the anger regulation strategy venting, and humor increase the likelihood of deviant resistance to change. Prior research in organizational justice perception has shown that when organizational decisions and managerial actions are deemed unfair, the affected employees experience feelings of anger, outrage and a desire for retribution resulting perceptions of procedural and interactional injustice have been associated with feelings of anger among employees. The researchers suggest future studies that focus on how feedback affects personality traits such as extraversion and anger. C hemiss, C, Extein M., Goleman, D. & Weissberg, R.P. (2006) Emotional Intelligence: What does the Research Really indicate? Educational Psychologist, 41( 4) 239-245. In this article, Goleman and his associates discuss specific critiques of emotional intelligence (EI) as presented by other researchers. The researchers address such criticisms of EI and the belief that
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Annotated Bibliography 3 EI contains too many constructs, it cannot be a real concept, research has not distinguished EI from personality and IQ, and that researchers investigating brain functions cannot prove that EI exist therefore, EI should not be taught in an academic environment. Goleman and his associates speak to each of these criticisms and confirm that there now exist more empirical support for EI theory than previously suggested. The authors also addressed confusion between fundamental competencies and EI’s core abilities. The authors did not test individuals or provide empirical evidence. However, they introduce a “Proposed Theory of Performance” as an avenue to clarify this distinction and they indicate that additional theoretical work is required to resolve any confusion.
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