Kids and Consumption - Kids and Consumption The Rise of...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Kids and Consumption The Rise of Sentimental Childhood Viviana Zelizer’s Pricing the Priceless Child : Two definitions of childhood (by the mid- 1800s) o 1700s child will most likely be born into a family engaged in agriculture . That child would probably have started to engage in some form of household labor quite young, and certainly by the age at which we send children to school. Child was seen as economically useful (and labouring) child and productive childhood (especially for poor and working class families as well as those born in industrial societies) “Productive childhood” – defend the right of a child to engage in labor for pay o Mid 1800s middle class families redefined the value of children. Child was no longer found in their capacity to labour and be economically productive , but rather valued for the sentimental and emotional role they played in the family “Sacred” – un-useful – child and sentimental childhood (emotional value) “Children were to be kept off the market, useless but loving, and off the streets, protected and supervised” o Early 1900s child labour became extremely contested and eventually abolished To some degree, we might argue, middle-class family patterns, conceptions of childhood, and moral stances were institutionalized and enforced upon the working class in the form of law o Dramatic shift in the social value of children Two ideologies were “productive childhood” and “sacred child” Class-coded definitions of childhood; middle-class view enshrined in law Links to middle-class family patterns, separate domestic sphere. During the 1800s, there was an increasing emphasis upon class separation between economic and non- economic spheres of life o “Separate spheres” – men = workers and main breadwinners and women = stay at home wife and looking after the vulnerable but valued children Implications o Holding the market at bay. Instead of having an ever expending market, we
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern