EDCI Interview #2 - Lauren Tolliver-King Main Interviewer...

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Lauren Tolliver-King Tolliver-King Main Interviewer Hockey Puck Problem Individual Section During my groups clinical interview our novice, Katherine, revealed her strengths and weaknesses as working through the hockey puck physics problem given. As the main interviewer, I asked Katherine questions regarding explanations for her answers, examined her knowledge in physics and problem solving and guided her to the best of my ability throughout the interview. Katherine’s immediate reaction after reading the problem was a lot of confusion. Her first questions were revolved around the arrows, which directed options of A,B and C and the number of pucks. Allen explained to her that each arrow obtains the same amount of force, the novice still did not know exactly where to start. Due to the misconceptions of the “barriers” to guide the desired direction of the puck, three different pucks, and three different arrows per puck I believe the novice was confused solely off the image. The diagram is very plain, and the directions extremely vague, which could have possibly delayed her processed of actually starting the problem. Observing Katherine it was obvious she was very puzzled because she did not draw or write down anything to organize her thoughts or ideas to assist her throughout the problem. Although, when I approached this problem I did not write anything originally either so that may be part of the issue that leads students astray while solving, failure to keep track of thoughts and or ideas. The novice seemed very puzzled and extremely futile, but finally chose her first answer of A/A. To clarify a misconception I faced when approaching this problem, the barriers, I informed Katherine that they are not really there, as there are no barriers in the actual problem the lines in the diagram are just to justify the desired directions of the puck. Under the impression that the puck was similar to a bowling ball, with barriers serving as “bumpers” on an alley, Allen informed Katherine that the surface resembled more of a vacuum-like space, rather 1
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Tolliver-King than a fractioned area. Katherine still seemed very confused, and did not change from her initial answer so he referenced playing pool. Katherine then understood the pool and the vacuum-like space analogy, although still was very confused and some misconceptions still were affecting her answer. Under the impression that the puck was stationary Katherine did not change her answer, which my group anticipated. Katherine’s common misconception of assuming the puck is
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