exam 2 study guide - Whats the difference between the...

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Whats the difference between the blocking effect and the comparator hypothesis? can someone explain sign tracking? Pair an object with reward, the subject will go get the object instead of the reward (responses are directed at the CS). Goal directed behavior is just the opposite. It is when the subject goes for the reward instead of the object. For example he used a beer bottle as an object and the reward as the rewarding effects the beer inside the bottle gives you. The subject knows they recieve rewarding effects once they see the beer bottle because of the fact that there is always beer in it. This makes the subject attracted to the actual bottle itself and not the beer inside subconsciously thank you Key Terms Chapter 4 1. Blocking effect (L.J Kamin) 1. Interference with the conditioning of a novel stimulus because of the presence of a previously conditioned stimulus Example given from textbook (Page 104): Each sunday your grandmother makes bread pudding you slightly agree with. You still eat it every sunday. A holiday falls on a Sunday so grandma puts a sauce on the bread that week. A gives strong CR while B gives a weak CR A → US [A+B] → US A= Bread pudding B= Sauce 2. Comparator hypothesis (R.R Miller) a. The idea that conditioned responding depends on a comparison between the associative strength of the conditioned stimulus (CS) and the associative strength of other cues present during training of the target CS AKA (page 116): “Presence of CS1 blocks the conditioning of CS2” 3. Conditioned compensatory-response (S.Siegel) a. A conditioned response opposite in form to the reaction elicited by the US and that therefore compensates for this reaction
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This is a great Youtube video that sums up everything with drug addiction: 4. Conditioned diminution of the UR a. A reduction in the magnitude of the response to an unconditioned stimulus caused by presentation of a CS that had been conditioned with that US 4. CS-preexposure effect / Latent-inhibition effect a. Interference with conditioning produced by repeated exposure to the CS before the conditioning trials. Also called latent-inhibition effect 4. Drug tolerance a. Reduction in the effectiveness of a drug as a result of repeated use of the drug 4. Higher-order conditioning a. A procedure in which a previously conditioned stimulus (CS1) is used to condition a new stimulus (CS2) Example used from textbook (page 94): A lady developed fear from crowd. To avoid the cro go to the movies in the mornings. One morning, the theater was packed with students. She came to associate cues of the movie theater with crowds. Results: Crowd (CS) created a conditioned fear to another (the movie theater). 8. Relative-waiting-time hypothesis a.
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