social lecture 3 - self esteem

social lecture 3 - self esteem - Self-Esteem...

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Self-Esteem Self-Esteem liking for one’s self Although individuals have a global sense of self-esteem (trait), their momentary self-esteem (state) may fluctuate based on their immediate experiences. (e.g., failing an exam may lower self-esteem, going out on a pleasant date may raise it)
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Self Esteem Scale Rosenberg’s scale is the most common method to measure trait self-esteem 10 statements 4 point self-rating scale: Strongly agree 1 Disagree 2 Agree 3 Strongly agree 4 --Anything above 2.5 is positive self-esteem
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Strategies that Protect Self-Esteem 1. Self-serving or Defensive Explanations 2. Self-handicapping 3. Basking in Reflected Glory (BIRG) 4. Self-affirmation 5. Downward Social Comparison
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Self-serving bias Areas in which we believe we are above average Ethics Professional competence Virtues Intelligence Health Attractiveness driving
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1. Self-serving (Defensive) Explanations A. Attributions of Causality that Externalize Failure and Internalize Success B. Defensive Attributions C. False consensus and false uniqueness
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A. Externalize Failure/Internalize Success Beckman: Method : student teachers attempted to teach a lesson to a child; child either succeeded or failed; teacher’s asked to explain child’s performance Results : ?
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B. Defensive Attributions One form of defensive attribution is to believe that bad things happen to bad people or at least, only to people who make stupid mistakes or poor choices. Therefore, those bad things won’t happen to me because I’m not that stupid or careless. Source of image: Microsoft Office Online.
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Defensive Attribution example just world belief (Lerner)—the belief that people get what they deserve and deserve what they get.
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