social lecture 10 - persuasion

social lecture 10 - persuasion - Attitudes and Persuasion...

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Attitudes and Persuasion Topics I. Attitudes are “beliefs and feelings that can influence our reactions.” (Myers, textbook) A. Bases of Attitudes B. Explicit and Implicit Attitudes II. Attitude Measurement III. Persuasion (Attitude Change) A. Applications B. Subliminal influence IV. Resistance to Persuasion
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A. Bases of Attitude s Attitudes are formed from the 3 fundamental elements of social psychology: affect, cognition, behavior 1. Affective reaction to an object 2. Information (cognition) about an object 3. Behavior toward an object
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Behavior Based Attitude An attitude based on observations of how one behaves toward an attitude object . Self-perception Self-justification (Dissonance theory) (covered this in units on self and attitude/behavior consistency)
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Cognitive Based Attitude An attitude based on beliefs about the properties of an object. E.g., liking an automobile because it gets good gas mileage or disliking a politician because he disagrees with your beliefs.
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Affective Based Attitude An attitude based on feelings about the attitude object. E.g., liking an actor because he/she looks good or disliking an amusement park ride because it scared you
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If affectively based attitudes do not come from examining the facts, where do they come from? 1. Sensory reactions -- e.g., the taste of sweet chocolate, admiring the form of a car or the shape of a person’s face 2. Conditioning – e.g., association with existing pleasant or unpleasant stimuli
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Attitudes and Persuasion Topics I. Attitudes are “beliefs and feelings that can influence our reactions.” (Myers, textbook) A. Bases of Attitudes B. Explicit and Implicit Attitudes II. Attitude Measurement III. Persuasion (Attitude Change) IV. Resistance to Persuasion
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B. Explicit and Implicit Attitudes Explicit Attitudes Attitudes that we consciously endorse and can easily report. Implicit Attitudes Attitudes that are involuntary, uncontrollable, and at times unconscious.
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Explicit vs. Impicit Attitudes Implicit attitudes are likely to affect judgments when making quick, automatic decisions Explicit attitudes likely to affect judgments when make deliberate, controlled decisions (Recall the study by Payne on implicit association between race and weapons/tools in the Social Cognition unit)
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II. Attitude Measurement Attitudes are not directly observable, so all measures are subject to error. Kinds of measures: Self-report Behavior Physiological indices E.g., blood pressure Implicit measures
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Examples of Explicit Self-report Measures about Gender I am in favor of equal rights for men and women Disagree 1 2 3 4 5 Agree A women’s role is to support her mate. Women are equally competent to men in most areas of life. Equality between the sexes has a detrimental impact on society.
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Example of Implicit Measure Assessing Gender Attitudes Implicit Association Test (IAT): 1. Subject discriminates between positive (e.g., good, competent) and negative (e.g., failure, mean) words.
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