w12 discussion - businesses pursued the disposable income...

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Based on your reading of Chapter 27 and of the primary documents, was the Midcentury "youth" a source of anxiety or a source of excitement in America? Think about the perspectives of parents, consumers, and businesses. I personally believe that the midcentury youth was a source of anxiety and also a source of excitement in America. Depending on your situation at the time, you’d view the movement as either a big business opportunity, or a stress-inducing responsibility. Many women who worked during the war were quickly returned to become stay-at-home mothers. Some couldn’t handle the stress of raising kids and being around them all the time. Many of them saw working as a recreational activity. “I begged and begged my husband to let me work, and finally he said I could go once or twice a week. I lasted for three weeks, or should I say he lasted for three weeks” ( Ladies Home Journal "Young Mother" , p. 2). There was also a side that saw this incoming flow of money to the American market and decided to invest. “Advertisers and
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Unformatted text preview: businesses pursued the disposable income of America’s affluent youth with a vengeance” ( Out of Many , p. 615). These trends troubled young parents, mainly because of the social pressure to provide your children with toys and luxuries for them to enjoy. “Counting only what is spent to satisfy their special teen-age demands, the youngsters and their parents will shell out about $10 billion this year, a billion more than the total sales of GM” ( The Teenage Consumer - Life , p. 1). In the magazine and print ads, there are many hints at a new prototypical American housewife, and it differs greatly from “Rosie the Riveter”. I found it strange how women’s social roles changed so drastically since the war had ended. One ad says, “don’t worry darling, you didn’t burn the beer!” ( Magazine and Print Ads , p. 1). This pokes fun at a woman’s inability to cook, because she hasn’t had to cook before due to her having a working job....
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