Dance Terms, Primitive, Ancient Era

Dance Terms, Primitive, Ancient Era - Dance 101 Notes DANCE...

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Dance 101 Notes DANCE PRODUCTION Proscenium stage – raised stage o Proscenium – separates audience from the performers (used to be called proscenium arch, but now they are more rectangular formed); Proscenium frames the stage Arena stage – no proscenium, audience is on all sides, no downstage or upstairs, it’s all open, dancers have a hard time focusing on who to face Stage directions – taken from performer’s perspective o Performer’s left is stage left, right is stage right, etc. o Going upstage is going away from the audience o Going downstage is going to audience Raked stage – slants down from back to front so audience can see back of stage better Raked audience – auditorium slanted down from back to front so that people in the back can see better Cyclorama (cyc) – covers the ugly back wall of the stage (hangs in far upstairs) o It is opaque; usually very tight-knit mesh woven fabric that feels like canvas of a sailboat o Usually a light color because things (lights) are projected onto it Backdrop – usually a painted 3-D drop shown in story dances that establishes the scene; usually hung upstage to give room for dancing Scrim – can be hung anywhere on stage, transparent b/c weaving of fabric is very loose, usually directly in front of cyc Baton – metal poles hung from ceiling, supported with chains; cyc, scrim, lights hang on it. Wings, legs, borders hang as well Act/grand curtain/drape – hangs in front of stage from one side of stage to the other Border – Top small curtain that hides the lights (therefore, hung downstage of the lights) Legs – short curtains that are on side of stage to create sidelines, audience could see backstage if legs hung improperly, to create wings o Longer legs called travelers are hung midstage to divide stage into two separate things Wings – sides of stage that cannot be seen by audience
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