Battleship Potemkin Chinatown analysis - Nima Mirzai...

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Nima Mirzai Take-home Exam #1 ENGFLM 530 Film Analysis — Fall 2012 When looking at continuity and discontinuity editing one cannot ignore examples from the early to mid 1900’s from examples of the soviet montage in Sergei Eisenstein’s “Potemkin” to Classic Hollywood cinema in films such as “The Man who Shot Liberty Vance” and “Chinatown”. In Classic Hollywood Cinema the overall goals of editing are to form fluidity in the film where the transition of different shots is continuous and almost unnoticed; whereas in soviet montage there is a motivation for interruption between sequences where the film desires to draw attention upon certain ideas. We see these strategies used by Sergie Eisenstein, when he uses the joining of and conflicting of shots to require the viewer to interpret and engage in the scenes. We also see how these two styles differ from “French New Wave” and it’s movement of “Auterism”. In “Breathless” Godard uses specific techniques to emphasize the effect a director has upon a movie and it’s editing. He goes against the common conventions of classic Hollywood cinema and exposes them for just what they are, merely conventions. To explore early editing styles we will look at the Soviet Montage, specifically Sergei Eisenstein and his use of discontinuity in his films at the time. Sergei Eisenstein’s theory was that through the juxtaposing of images by editing he would be able to create ideas or have a greater impact beyond the images of the film itself. He believed in creating scenes like cells that when put together would cause
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collision and conflict. Eisenstein’s best representation of this was in his film “Battleship Potemkin”, in which we see his montage style and editing techniques he uses to draw attention to the film itself and its political motivation. A few techniques Eisenstein uses are collision and conflict in specific sequences, intercutting and crosscutting, and conflict between an event and its duration. These three techniques
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