Review_of_Architects_of_Austerity_Intern

Review_of_Architects_of_Austerity_Intern - 1 Architects of...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Architects of Austerity: International Finance and the Politics of Growth , by Aaron Major . Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2014. 254pp. $60 cloth. ISBN: 9780804788342 William Davies Goldsmiths, University of London [email protected] Economic Sociology, Globalization, Policy, Political Sociology Preprint of article published in Contemporary Sociology – available for download at http://csx.sagepub.com/content/45/1/63.full Political economists are prone to epochal thinking. Marxists, with their emphasis upon historic capitalist crises and shifts in hegemony, are guilty of many of the exaggerations that can result. And yet historians and sociologists of ideas are no less liable to fall into the trap of imposing excessively tidy delineations upon past events. The example of Keynesianism and its transition to neoliberalism is a case in point, an epochal shift that is now treated as a matter of historical common sense. By standard reckoning, the post-War era is divided cleanly into two separate parts of roughly thirty years each: the Keynesian era of social democracy, ‘embedded liberalism’ and declining inequality (known romantically in France as les trente glorieuses ), then the neoliberal era of financialisation, market discipline and escalating inequality.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2 Problematising this simplicity is important, both for reasons of good scholarship and because the most recent ‘historic crisis’ does not seem to have performed the epoch-ending role that was initially expected of it. As Mike Savage has pointed out, one thing that sociologists could usefully learn from Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century is how to think in a less epochal fashion (Savage, 2014; Piketty, 2014). In his immunity to regulationist or institutionalist concerns about each era’s dominant form of capitalism, Piketty is able to study trends in a more agnostic and empirically sensitive fashion.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern