Higgins_1996_-_Clay_Tobacco_Pipes_From_E

Higgins_1996_-_Clay_Tobacco_Pipes_From_E - Clay Tobacco...

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Clay Tobacco Pipes From Excavations At Berry Pomeroy Castle, Devon, 1980-1991 D. A. Higgins 1996
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DEVON ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY PROCEEDINGS No. 54 1996 Berry POlIleroy Castle Reprinted from Stewart Brown, BerryPomeroyCast/e, 239-247 (335pp)
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Appendix 4 CLAY TOBACCO PIPES By DAVID HIGGINS INTRODUCTION This report considers the clay tobacco pipes recovered from Berry Pomeroy Castle between 1980 and 1991. During this period eight separate collections of material were made:- Site Code Bowl Stem Tips Contexts Comments BP80A 3 7 0 7 All 17th or early 18th century. BP 81B 1 1 0 1 BP 8IC 10 25 0 14 Includes some very early pipes. 249 2 17 0 9 No very early pipes. BP863/4 8 31 0 1 Including some very early pipes. BP 89 1 1 0 2 BP 91 21 62 1 16 Mainly 17th & 18th century; a few very early pipes. BPe 91 9 22 1 10 Quite a number of very early pipes. Totals 55 166 2 60 The total number of fragments collected (223) is not very large, nor are there any sizeable groups. The largest group consists of the 39 pieces collected in 1986. Discounting these, the remaining 184 pieces came from 60 different contexts, an average of only three pieces per context. Such small numbers cannot convincingly be used to argue for the absolute date of the individual contexts although they do provide a useful terminus ante quem for the deposits in which they occur and, taken collectively, they provide a reasonably good dating framework within the site matrices. The pipes as a whole also reveal patterns reflecting the site's evolution which would not be apparent from the individual contexts alone. The main phases of activity represented by the pipe deposition, for example, are between c. 1580-1610 and c. 1680-1720. These periods coincide with the remodelling of the northern range in about 1600 and the abandonment and demolition of the buildings a century later. TREATMENT OF THE MATERIAL An archive has been prepared containing details of all of the pipes recovered. Each of the fragments has been individually assessed, dated and recorded using a system which is being developed at the University of Liverpool. Based on this information separate context summary sheets have been compiled which give an overview of the number of fragments recovered and the overall date range for each context. This detailed information has been deposited as a part of the site archive. 239
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For this report a representative selection of the bowl forms and the marked and decorated pieces has been illustrated (1-27). The pipes will first be considered collectively as an artefact group and secondly in terms of the information they provide about the site. THE PIPES (Figs. 71-2) The most striking feature about this group is the number of very early pipe bowls which are present. The earliest recognised styles of pipe date from c. 1580-1610 (Atkinson and Oswald 1969, 178). At this date tobacco was a lUxury item and the habit of smoking was only just being disseminated through society. Early pipes are occasionally found all over the country but they are always rare, usually occurring as single examples and very few have ever been recovered from stratified archaeological contexts.
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  • Summer '14
  • 2nd millennium, pipes, bowl, early 17th century, c. 1580-1610

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