INEQUALITY_CAPITAL_AND_MANY_OTHER_THINGS

INEQUALITY_CAPITAL_AND_MANY_OTHER_THINGS - Geloso This...

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Geloso Essays in Economic & Business History forthcoming in Volume XXXIV, 2016 This article was published on-line on March 29, 2016 Essays in ECONOMIC & BUSINESS HISTORY The Journal of the Economic & Business History Society Editor Jason E. Taylor Central Michigan University Copyright © 2016, The Economic and Business History Society. This is an open access journal. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles in this journal without asking prior permission from the publisher or the author. ISSN 0896-226X LCC 79-91616 HC12.E2
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Geloso 1 Essays in Economic & Business History forthcoming in Volume XXXIV, 2016 INEQUALITY, CAPITAL AND MANY OTHER THINGS IN THE 21 ST CENTURY (AND BEFORE) A Review of Unequal Gains: American Growth and Inequality since 1700 by Peter H. Lindert and Jeffrey Williamson (2016: Princeton University Press) Vincent Geloso London School of Economics Department of Economic History Editor’s Note: It is Essays tradition to publish the keynote address from the prior year’s Economic and Business History Society (EBHS) annual conference as the lead article in each year’s volume. Jeffrey Williamson delivered the keynote at the May 2015 conference, “Unequal Gains: American Growth and Inequality since 1774.” As the talk was largely a summary of Dr. Williamson’s (then forthcoming) book with Peter Lindert, and the talk can be viewed in its entirety on our website, we felt an appropriate treatment of this keynote talk would be a detailed review of the book. 1 The result is the following review by Vincent Geloso of the London School of Economics. Vincent won the Lynne Doti Award at last year’s EBHS conference for the best paper presented by a graduate student. 1 Here is a direct link to the talk: 72f3da1d
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Inequality and Capital in the 21 st Century 2 Essays in Economic & Business History forthcoming in Volume XXXIV, 2016 Introduction A year ago, members of the Economic and Business History Society met in Wisconsin for their annual conference where the keynote speaker was Jeffrey Williamson. For decades now, Williamson has been one of the foremost economic historians. His work has spanned numerous topics including crowding-out during the early industrial revolution, international migration, the effects of terms of trade on industrialization and the measurement of living standards. However, no topic seems to have been dearer to Williamson than inequality the topic he chose for his keynote speech. The speech was based on his work with Peter Lindert on inequality in the United States since the colonial era. Between that speech and this writing, Unequal Gains , which summarizes their research, has been published. Both Lindert and Williamson have been frequent visitors to the issue of inequality. Lindert has been studying the role of the rise of the public sector on economic growth and the distribution for a very long time and produced one of the key books on the topic,
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