LECTUR~10_13.5 - 13.5 EQUATIONS OF MOTION NORMAL AND...

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13.5: EQUATIONS OF MOTION: NORMAL AND TANGENTIAL COORDINATES
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EQUATIONS OF MOTION: NORMAL AND TANGENTIAL COORDINATES Today s Objectives : Students will be able to: 1. Apply the equation of motion using normal and tangential coordinates. In-Class Activities : Applications Equation of Motion Using n-t Coordinates Concept Quiz Group Problem Solving Attention Quiz
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READING QUIZ 2. The positive n direction of the normal and tangential coordinates is ____________. A) normal to the tangential component B) always directed toward the center of curvature C) normal to the bi-normal component D) All of the above. 1. The normal component of the equation of motion is written as Σ F n =m a n , where Σ F n is referred to as the _______. A) impulse B) centripetal force C) tangential force D) inertia force
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APPLICATIONS Race track turns are often banked to reduce the frictional forces required to keep the cars from sliding up to the outer rail at high speeds. If the car s maximum velocity and a minimum coefficient of friction between the tires and track are specified, how can we determine the minimum banking angle (q) required to prevent the car from sliding up the track?
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APPLICATIONS (continued) This picture shows a ride at the amusement park. The hydraulically-powered arms turn at a constant rate, which creates a centrifugal force on the riders. We need to determine the smallest angular velocity of cars A and B such that the passengers do not lose contact with their seat. What parameters are needed for this calculation?
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APPLICATIONS (continued) Satellites are held in orbit around the earth by using the earth s gravitational pull as the centripetal force – the force acting to change the direction of the satellite s velocity. Knowing the radius of orbit of the satellite, we need to determine the required speed of the satellite to maintain this orbit. What equation governs this situation?
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NORMAL & TANGENTIAL COORDINATES (Section 13.5)
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