Gero 1985 - Socio-Politics & the Woman-at-Home Ideology-2

Gero 1985 - Socio-Politics & the Woman-at-Home...

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Society for American Archaeology is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to American Antiquity. Society for American Archaeology Socio-Politics and the Woman-at-Home Ideology Author(s): Joan M. Gero Source: American Antiquity, Vol. 50, No. 2, Golden Anniversary Issue (Apr., 1985), pp. 342-350 Published by: Society for American Archaeology Stable URL: Accessed: 20-03-2016 20:51 UTC Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at info/about/policies/terms.jsp JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] This content downloaded from 136.152.209.120 on Sun, 20 Mar 2016 20:51:05 UTC All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions
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SOCIO-POLITICS AND THE WOMAN-AT-HOME IDEOLOGY Joan M. Gero Archaeologists, as explorers and discoverers, have maintained the myth of objective research far longer than have researchers in other social science disciplines. Focused on action, the "cowboys of science" (Alaskan bumper sticker 1981) have dabbled little in self-reflective criticism. Now at 50, however, the discipline is becoming aware that our notions of the past, our episte- mologies, our research emphases, the methods we employ in our research, and the interpretations we bring to and distill from our investigations, are far from value-neutral. Historical insights such as Ford's (1973:84), that the development of prehistory coincides with and reinforces the devel- opment of nationalism, Leone's (1973:129) that nations would spend millions of dollars annually on archaeology only for an important purpose: to obtain "an empirical substantiation of national mythology," or Clarke's (1973:6) reflective comments on "the transitions from consciousness through self-consciousness to critical self-consciousness," indicate an awareness that archaeology is funda- mentally tied to and conditioned by the larger society that supports it. Suddenly we are witnessing the appearance of several new critical approaches to the articulation between archaeological undertakings and the social conditions in which they are achieved. We see a critical philosophy of archaeology (Hanen and Kelley 1983; Kelley and Hanen 1985; Wylie 1981, 1983a, 1983b), a critical historiography of archaeology (Fahnestock 1984; Kristiansen 1981; Meltzer 1983a, 1983b; Trigger 1980), critical appraisals of methodology (Moore and Keene 1983), an applied archaeology (Claassen 1982; Kendall 1982; McCartney 1982), and, finally, a reflective sociology of archaeology, the focus of this paper, which has been called the socio-politics of archaeology (Gero et al. 1983).
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