hum growth W3A1 - Part 1 Social and psychological changes...

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Part 1 Social and psychological changes occur in adolescences from ages 9 through 12. For adolescences this can be a time of both awkwardness and discovery. This transitional period can bring up concerns of freedom and self-identity, many adolescents and their peers face tough choices regarding schoolwork, sexuality, drugs, alcohol, and social life. Peer groups, romantic interests and outside appearance tend to naturally increase in importance for some time during a teen's journey toward adulthood (Psychology Today, 2002). Boys that tend to mature early usually have a positive affect mentally verses girls who have an early onset of puberty might feel insecure and awkward. When the child is transitioning through puberty their voices, bodies, hormone levels are changing, and also they are able to think hypothetically. There thinking becomes more multidimensional, rather than limited to a single issue. “A psychological definition distinguishes adolescence in terms of the developmental tasks to be accomplished, each of which relates to the central task of achieving a personal identity. A sociological definition defines adolescents in terms of their status within society, specifically, as a transitional period between childhood and adulthood (Cobb, 2010)”. Emotional change involves physical development. While cognitive changes involve thought, intelligence, and language. Social changes involve relationships with other people in emotions, in personality and in the social context. Emotional changes show that your child is forming an independent identity and learning to be an adult. As your child begin to go through emotional changes there brain is still learning how to control and express emotions in a grown-up way, so there moods might seem unpredictable. Your child will be more sensitive to your emotions. Young people get better at understanding and processing other people’s feelings as they get older. While they’re developing these skills, they can sometimes misread facial expressions or body language. As your child continues to go through emotional changes they become more
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