student centered instructional design

student centered instructional design - PRECONFERENCE...

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© Sweeney, Diane (for more information or to upload documents, please visit . p. 1 of handouts for Preconference session with Diane Sweeney PRECONFERENCE SESSION Student-Centered Instructional Design and Assessment with Diane Sweeney EARCOS Teachers’ Conference—March, 2014 AM What is Student-Centered Instructional Design and Assessment? The Process Use of Standards Role of Formative Assessments Analysis of Student Learning Planning Differentiated Instruction Best Practice in Instructional Design Elementary and secondary examples of what it looks like to move through the process Lunch PM The Role of Collaboration in Student-Centered Instructional Design and Assessment Data-Driven Conversations Learning Labs PLC’s HANDOUTS What is Student-Centered Instructional Design and Assessment? How it’s Done: 1. Design learning targets (‘I can’ statements) 2. Analyze student work against the learning targets 3. Plan differentiated instruction based on the analysis of student work 4. Deliver differentiated instruction and collect student evidence during instructional time 5. Design ways for students to self-assess against the learning targets Forma&ve Assessment Learning Targets Analysis, Planning, & Delivery Student-­૒ Centered Instruc&on Morning Reflection: How do you approach planning and instructional design? In what ways does your planning set you up to meet your students’ needs? In what ways do you feel challenged to do so? Please spend 3-5 minutes to write reflectively and share with a partner.
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© Sweeney, Diane (for more information or to upload documents, please visit . p. 2 of handouts for Preconference session with Diane Sweeney Step 1: Design Learning Targets (‘I can’ statements) Read the standard and craft a series of 5-8 ‘I can’ statements, or learning targets, that you feel summarize what the students should ‘know and be able to do’. 2 nd Grade Reading—Literature Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why , and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges. 5 th Grade Writing—Opinion-Based W.5.1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose. Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details. Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently , specifically ).
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  • Fall '16
  • Touring car racing, Diane Sweeney, preconference session

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