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Research Paper - Prof Boyd Research Paper Cultural Teachings of Hindu Music A Look into the Music of Past and Present Indian Culture The country of

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Unformatted text preview: Prof. Boyd Research Paper Cultural Teachings of Hindu Music: A Look into the Music of Past and Present Indian Culture The country of India has been populated for hundreds of years, and through those years there has been war, drought, and famine, but one thing has been consistent and that is the culture. The culture of India is full of different religions, texts, and music. Some of which has had little to no change still to this day. The Indian culture is rich in the sense of its musical scene both in the past and what is now the present. The country of India is so large that we must look at it in two sections, that of North India, and that of South India. For the sake of reference North India will consist of all that is North to and including the Gujarati region, all that is North of and including the region of Hindi, and all that is North of and including the region of Oriya. Southern India consists of all that is south to the above mentioned regions. However there is some overlapping of regions due to the fact that there is no absolute division in the land and this division is merely fictitious only established for the sense of location. 1 The music of India has changed drastically during the twenty-first century due to the social changes in Indian society; because of these changes life for musicians too had to be changed as well. With the division of north and south India there are several categories in which we could use to divide the two from, the main one would be the division of the languages used in the north and in the south. In the north the language was derived from Sanskrit and some examples of languages used in the north are: Hindi-Urdu, Maharati, Gujarati, Punjabi, Bengali, and others. In the large southern portion the Dravidian-derived languages can be found: Tamil, Telegu, 1 1 See “maps” located in the Bibliography Malayalam, and Kannada. 2 Besides this obvious linguistic division in India the main differences in the style of music had not been noticeably present until about the thirteenth century. The two styles are called Hindustani and Karnatak. The Hindustani style is that of northern India, and the Karnatak is from the south. Even with this division of northern and southern styles there has been a large amount of overlapping and exchange of the material. Another way to look at the musical culture of India would be too look at what the “Great Tradition” is and what the “Little Traditions” are. The “Great Tradition” is what we in the western world would call “classical” in style. The “Little Traditions” are more so of the regional styles, and are often extremely old, very well refined, and tend to be more specific to certain areas. One thing to look at when we are talking about Indian cultural music is the devotional aspect. This aspect is clearly identifiable in the Indian music. India’s mystic philosophies are at once universal (and eagerly pursued throughout the world) and sectarian....
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This test prep was uploaded on 04/19/2008 for the course RELIGION 260 taught by Professor Boyd during the Fall '07 term at Hope.

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Research Paper - Prof Boyd Research Paper Cultural Teachings of Hindu Music A Look into the Music of Past and Present Indian Culture The country of

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