Fan activism, cybervigilantism, and othering mechanisms in kpop

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PraxisFan activism, cybervigilantism, and Othering mechanisms in K-pop fandomSun JungNational University of Singapore, Singapore[0.1] Abstract—Korean popular music (K-pop) fandom may serve as a case study to identifyboth cynical and utopian views of fans' participatory Net activism by addressing three keyaspects: fan activism, cybervigilantism, and Othering mechanisms. Fancom (fan company) inthe K-pop scene refers to the way fans systematically manage their own stars. These notions ofassertive fancom practices address how fans actively participate in sociocultural events such asfund raising, donating to charity, and volunteering in emergency situations. This managementmay take another turn, however: antifandom surrounds K-pop star Tablo, signifyingcybervigilantism of sinsang teolgi (personal information theft), a term referring to the onlineactivities of a group of netizens who seek to expose the personal details of perceivedwrongdoers by publishing them online as a form of punishment. The Tablo case revitalizedpublic concern over privacy and the security of personal information in the digital era. Finally,Othering mechanisms in participatory online K-pop fandom display a strong sense ofnationalism and even racism, as demonstrated by responses to anti-Korean rhetoric posted onthe MySpace page of K-pop idol Jae-Beom. This highlights the relationship betweenparticipatory Net activism and nationalistic sentiment active within K-pop fandom. Some K-popfan practices may have negative connotations, but by engaging with specific civic issues andsocial events, participatory fan practices encourage people to interact, discuss, and challengeconventional discourses, which may lead to new forms of social action.[0.2] Keywords—Antifandom; Fancom; Jae-Beom; JYJ; Korean popular culture; Tablo; TVXQJung, Sun. 2012. "Fan Activism, Cybervigilantism, and Othering Mechanisms in K-popFandom." In "Transformative Works and Fan Activism," edited by Henry Jenkins and SangitaShresthova, special issue, Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 10. doi:10.3983/twc.2012.0300.1. Introduction[1.1] On June 10 and 11, 2011, SM Town Live in Paris was held at the Le Zénith de Parisconcert hall in France. Five Korean popular music, or K-pop, bands from the SM Entertainmentstable—TVXQ, SNSD, Super Junior, f(x), and SHINee—held their first concert in a Europeancity and attracted more than 14,000 fans from across Europe. Initially, SM scheduled only oneshow on June 10. When the tickets to the first concert sold out in 15 minutes, hundreds ofFrench fans performed a flash mob dance outside the Louvre Museum in protest, and SM soonannounced a second concert. New media technologies drove fan-based Net activism via fanpages on Facebook and K-pop channels on YouTube, mobilizing fellow fans and promoting theevent. The success of the French fans' protest for the SM Town Live in Paris concerts indicatesthe power of participatory online fandom in the K-pop realm. This example also demonstrates

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Term
Spring
Professor
Newton
Tags
Fan, Fandom, K pop, SM Entertainment, Net activism

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