muh2051finalexampictures

muh2051finalexampictures - Lesson 34 Temples of China Korea...

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Unformatted text preview: Lesson 34- Temples of China, Korea, and Japan in Hong Kong, as seen in the above photograph of a Chinese junk, photographed from Kowloon Lesson 35 pipa Guqin yangqin xun ( hsun ) xiao • ti-tzu dizi Xeng gourd instrument Xeng The most common sized Chinese sheng, played by a Chinese musician. David Badagnani demonstrating the Chinese sheng (front view). David Badagnani demonstrating the Chinese sheng (side view). A bass sheng photographed in the musical instrument museum in the Civic Center in Hong Kong. Notice the buttons for changing the pitches, rather than the holes. The instrument is so large that fingerholes are not practical. This is a modern invention to accomodate the Western preference for bass sounds in an ensemble. Lesson 36-China 2 qin ( ch'in ) The qin is most often played on a small table (as seen in the old painting at the top of this page and in the photograph of Ning Wu), many Chinese paintings from the 1600 and 1700s show it being played on the ground in front of the player (or sometimes on his lap, as seen in this old painting . The photograph to the left is of Ning Wu from Beijing, China. She was an ethnomusicology student at Florida State University and founder of the first Chinese Music Ensemble at FSU. Playing a qin zheng (cheng) of Ai-lin Chen playing the zheng with the Chinese Music Ensemble from the Florida State University. The yang qin (both) Lesson 37-China 3 an early pipa played perhaps by a court musician the pipa played (or held) by a guardian of a temple gate. Yi-Yi Wang from Shanghai playing the pipa Ehru played as a soloist ehru played in an ensemble ehru? Lesson 38-China 4 There are, for example, folk ensembles for the rural people; court ensembles for the royalty at one time (as seen in this painting; notice the lady in back repairing a string on her zither, while perhaps the two women in front are tuning or practicing; meanwhile, the children are playing at the right while someone else sits) In the former are the zithers, especially the zheng (seen in this photograph, left ) and yang-qin , and the lutes, especially the pipa (seen on the far left of this photograph Ensembles for Peking Opera often accompany Chinese dance in addition to Chinese operatic singing, as seen in this photograph of Chinese dancers in costume Lesson 39-Korea historical painting shows the...
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muh2051finalexampictures - Lesson 34 Temples of China Korea...

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