Outline Chps 13 & 14 - Nicholas Russo Moloney2 Chapter 13...

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Nicholas Russo Moloney2Chapter 13: The Rise of a Mass DemocracyIntroductionThe so-called Era of Good Feelings was shattered, as political controversy surrounded slavery. Political conflict became necessary for the health of a democracy.From 1824-1840, there were drastic changes in campaigning and political parties. Non-existent political factions, once thought to be simply disruptors, became accepted into political life.Two new political parties, the Democrats and the Whigs, reinstated a two-party system. New ways of campaigning put candidates in the spotlight, and voting numbers rose dramatically.The “Corrupt Bargain” of 1824The election of 1824 marked the last of the old-style elections. James Monroe was the last of the VirginiaDynasty, and four new candidates rose to the occasion of replacing him.These were John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, William H. Crawford and Andrew Jackson. Their political allegiance was uncertain, all professed to be Republican. Andrew Jackson was by far the most popular, he gained the most popular votes, but lost in the electoral college. The House of Representatives was forced to choose a winner out of the top three.Henry Clay, who was kicked out of the race, presided over the decision as he was the speaker of the house. He absolutely hated Jackson, so by process of elimination he found common ground with John Quincy Adams. Due to Clay’s support, Adams was chosen as the winner on the first vote. Clay became Adams’ secretary of state. The position was regarded as one that eventually led to presidency.Jackson’s supporters were mad, they believed that Adams bribed Clay with the position, and that Adams was the people’s second choice below Jackson. Protests deemed the election a “corrupt bargain.”There is no evidence to suggest a formal bribe, Adams was honest and Clay was fit for the position. However, the outcry at Adams’ election showed that change was in the air. What was once common practice was now deemed undemocratic. The next president would not be chosen secretly.A Yankee Misfit in the White HouseJohn Quincy Adams was short, bald and austere, just like his father John Adams. He was not a politician, but rather an indoor thinker who was irritable and sarcastic. Yet, he was one of the most successful secretaries of state under Monroe.Adams was sentenced to four years in the White House, under constant fire with charges of corruption. He was a minority president, and had very little popular support. John Quincy Adams, although accused of being corrupt, refused to fire and hire government officials to benefit his supporters. This led to many of his supporters abandoning him.Adams was very nationalistic, but was president during an era when people fought for states’ rights and believed in sectionalism. He followed in George Washington’s footsteps in advocating for the betterment of federal functions and buildings.

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