Outline Chps 33 & 34 - Nicholas Russo Moloney2 Chapter 33 The Great Depression and the New Deal Introduction The people were ready for change as the

Outline Chps 33 & 34 - Nicholas Russo Moloney2 Chapter 33...

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Nicholas Russo Moloney2 Chapter 33: The Great Depression and the New Deal Introduction The people were ready for change as the election of 1932 neared, Hoover was inadequate. He was re- nominated by the Republican party with a platform based on anti-depression and anti-prohibition policies. The Democrats nominated Franklin D. Roosevelt, who was the governor of New York. He was also the assistant secretary of the navy, and appealed strongly to the traumatized public. FDR: Politician in a Wheelchair Before he was restricted to a wheelchair, FDR was considered to be charming, yet sometimes arrogant. He schooled himself in patience, tolerance, compassion, and will power. His wife, Eleanor, was a champion of the dispossessed and shared in FDR’s political career. She became the most active First Lady in history, as her speeches influenced the policies of the national government. Eleanor battled for the impoverished an oppressed, and even confronted segregation. She became a huge figure of the 20 th century, and even though her marriage was rocky, was loved by liberals. FDR was a great orator, and sponsored heavy spending to relieve human suffering. He was genuinely concerned for the plight of man. His platform was designed upon a balanced budget and many social and economic reforms. He accepted the nomination in person. Presidential Hopefuls of 1932 FDR was determined to prove critics wrong and showcase his radiance to the voters. He preached for the New Deal, but his speeches were somewhat vague, as they were written for him by a small group of reform professors who were kind of a kitchen cabinet. He denounced Hoover’s actions and deficits. FDR was full of optimism; his campaign slogan was “Happy Days Are Here Again.” Exhausted and grim Hoover could only muster an “It Might Have Been Worse.” He insisted that the uncertainty of FDR’s election could make the depression worse. Hoover reaffirmed his faith in American free enterprise and individual initiative, and upheld the tariff. Hoover’s Humiliation in 1932 Roosevelt won in a landslide. Even blacks had moved away from the Republicans, as they had suffered the worst. The public just wanted change. Hoover would remain president until March 4, but could not pass any policies without FDR, who was uncooperative. He wanted no responsibility without authority. Hoover was really trying to influence the new president on an anti-inflationary policy, which would have obstructed New Deal policies. The nation during this time grew increasingly worse, some say that FDR prolonged this so that he looked more like a savior when he took office. FDR and the Three R’s: Relief, Recovery, Reform
With FDR’s inauguration, the people had new hope. He announced war on the depression and moved decisively. He declared a national banking holiday from March 6-10, in order to prepare to open other banks on as sounder basis. He then met with Congress for the “Hundred Days” to pass legislation.

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