Unit 3 Primary Sources - Nicholas Russo Moloney2 Unit 3...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 7 pages.

Nicholas Russo Moloney2 Unit 3 Primary Sources Primary Source #1: Marshall Sanctions the Bank Chief Justice John Marshall, a die-hard Hamiltonian Federalist, led the decision in McCulloch v. Maryland. This supported the constitutionality of the Second Bank of the United States, and asserted the power of the federal government over the states. In his argument, Marshall admits that there are limits to the powers of the government, but that its purpose must be executed within the scope of the Constitution, and with appropriateness and legitimacy for the people. He upholds the notion that taxation is a shared power, but states that states have no power concerning exports or imports. States also cannot conflict with a federal law or the Constitution. Marshall continues by saying that the Bank of the United States cannot be taxed by as states, as it conflicts with the Constitution. He states that the Constitution is supreme and cannot be controlled by states. Primary Source #2: Jefferson Stretches the Constitution to buy Louisiana In 1803, Thomas Jefferson sent James Monroe to Paris to buy New Orleans for a max of $10 million. However, Napoleon offered to sell all of Louisiana, and Jefferson accepted even though he was exceeding his constitutional powers. The Constitution did not specifically give the president the power to annex foreign territory, but Louisiana could not be passed up. In this letter, Jefferson defends his actions. He starts by saying that he is confident that both Houses will ratify the treaty, and that there will be an amendment to the Constitution soon after, which would confirm and approve the act. Jefferson states that the Constitution does say anything about acquiring foreign territory, and that he has exceeded its provisions in acting. He ends by stating that the purchase of Louisiana was done for the good of the people; and that he and Congress will not be condemned by their nation, as this act has consequently strengthened the Constitution. Primary Source #3 Louis and Clark Meet a Grizzly Now that Louisiana had been claimed, its vast wilderness needed to be explored. President Jefferson chose Meriwether Lewis and William Clark for the job. Along with a party of 34 soldiers and 10 civilians, they left St. Louis in 1804 and reached the Pacific Coast in 1805. When they arrived back home in 1806, Lewis and Clark had collected many botanical and geological specimens and made maps of the country. This is an account from Lewis’ diary was written on May 14 th , 1805 in eastern Montana. Lewis starts by describing his surroundings; he says it was foggy in the morning, and that he saw many herds of buffalo. He describes how Clark walked ashore and killed a buffalo cow, and how he himself wanted veal and killed a buffalo calf and a wolf. One of the party members wounded a brown bear very badly, but did not think it would be a good idea to pursue him. In the evening the bear was spotted, and some men went to attack him. Four of them shot at the same time and all of the bullets contacted the bear. The bear ran at them and two others who had reserved their shots fired at him.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture