AstronomyFeb5 - Astronomy Feb. 05, 2008- age of clusters...

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Unformatted text preview: Astronomy Feb. 05, 2008- age of clusters determined by how many stars are off the main sequence and how high up it is (the farther up the younger it is)- How do stars get on the main sequence- Star formation o Molecular clouds William Herschel noticed the dark clouds in the galaxy (Holes in the Heavens) Dark clouds are filled with gas and dust Dust absorbs starlight, more of the blue than red, that’s why stars near edge appear reddened Red and infrared light can pass through the dust You can see through the cloud thanks to infrared 99% of the cloud is gas and then 1% is dust The extremely low temperature clouds and molecule clouds have a loooong ass wavelength so they’re big ass red • Most molecules are hydrogen but there’s also carbon monoxide o Trapezium and Orion are the nearest and youngest nebulae and cluster that we can study in detail o Carbon monoxide helps us study the gas and not just the dust o The middle of the nebula is hollowed out by the radiation of the stars...
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course AST 201 taught by Professor Abraham during the Spring '08 term at University of Toronto.

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AstronomyFeb5 - Astronomy Feb. 05, 2008- age of clusters...

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