Second Paper - Robert J. England II HON 211 David Gross...

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Robert J. England II HON 211 – David Gross Monday, November 27, 2006 The Creation's Education: the Texts of Frankenstein's Creature The ability to be truly educated is one of the inherent traits of humankind, for no animal is able to be taught morality and literacy as humans can. Education has been connected to literacy since the origins of both; the primary mark of an educated individual was originally (though today less so) the ability to read and write in either the native tongue or a different language equated with great minds. Frankenstein's creation was educated almost entirely from a few spare books he found during his secret stay at the home of the De Laceys. These three texts, Sorrows of Werther , Plutarch's Lives , and Paradise Lost , had very unique subject matters and presentations, and developed the psychology of the creature by having him question his new society. They influenced the creature's feelings and actions, and helped forge his own humanity (or lack thereof). With a close analysis of the literary material that the creature had at his disposal, we can better unravel his mysterious thoughts, and come closer to understanding his unusual actions. Johann von Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther was the creature's first literary experience with sorrow and death. This novel, a tragedy, tells of the fictional Werther, who, upon falling in love with an engaged woman, spent the next several years in vain attempting to win her love. He became friends with the woman's husband in order to be closer to her, and in doing so found enough respect in the man to not fight him for her love. In the end, Werther resorted to suicide by pistol to finally eradicate the sorrows of his position. While Paradise Lost showed basic love, the love in Sorrows was an unattainable, wistful love that was so impossible to fulfill that it drove an otherwise sane, educated young man to kill himself, purely because of the sorrow he endured.
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This text was the creature's first exposure to numerous aspects of love and death. Many brand-new feelings, such as love and despair, were presented to the creature upon
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Second Paper - Robert J. England II HON 211 David Gross...

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