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Read before class3 Self presentation

Read before class3 Self presentation - at 9:44 PM...

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February 19, 2013 at 9:44 PM 452_chapter_07.docx page 1 of 42 CHAPTER 07 SELF-PRESENTATION I. THE NATURE OF SELF-PRESENTATION .............................................................................................. 3 A. W HY D O P EOPLE E NGAGE IN S ELF -P RESENTATION ? .................................................................................. 3 B. W HEN AND H OW D O P EOPLE M ANAGE I MPRESSIONS ? ............................................................................. 5 C. I NDIVIDUAL D IFFERENCES IN S ELF -P RESENTATION ..................................................................................... 7 II. CREATING DESIRED IMPRESSIONS ................................................................................................. 11 A. W HAT I MPRESSIONS D O P EOPLE T RY TO C REATE ? .................................................................................. 11 B. W HAT C ONSTITUTES A D ESIRABLE I MPRESSION ? .................................................................................... 13 C. I DENTITY P REDICAMENTS ................................................................................................................... 17 D. I DENTITY -R EPAIR T ACTICS .................................................................................................................. 20 III. SELF-PRESENTATIONS AND PRIVATE SELF-CONCEPTIONS .............................................................. 20 A. R OLE I NTERNALIZATION ..................................................................................................................... 21 B. C ARRY -O VER E FFECTS IN S ELF -P RESENTATION ....................................................................................... 22 C. S YMBOLIC S ELF -C OMPLETION T HEORY ................................................................................................. 24 IV. SELF-PRESENTATION AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR ................................................................................ 26 A. S ELF -P RESENTATION AND S ELF -E NHANCEMENT ...................................................................................... 26 B. S INCERITY AND A UTHENTICITY VERSUS P RETENSE AND D ECEIT ................................................................... 30 V. CHAPTER SUMMARY ..................................................................................................................... 32
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February 19, 2013 at 9:44 PM 452_chapter_07.docx page 2 of 42 CHAPTER 07 SELF-PRESENTATION There will be time, there will be time, to prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet. T.S. Eliot, The Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufrock The self- concept seems like a very private phenomenon. After all, people’s thoughts about themselves are hidden and are often highly personal. Yet the self-concept is also very much a social phenomenon. It has social roots (e.g., reflected appraisals, social comparison), it includes social identities and roles, and it guides our perception of others and our behavior in social settings. In this chapter we will explore the social side of the self in the context of self- presentational behavior. Self-presentational behavior is any behavior intended to create, modify, or maintain an impression of ourselves in the minds of others. 1 According to this definition, whenever we are attempting to lead people to think of us in a particular way, we are engaging in self-presentation. Because much of our time is spent in the company of other people, self-presentation is a pervasive feature of social life. We even engage in self-presentation when we are alone; for example, we rehearse what we are going to say or do in public, molding our behavior to an imaginary or anticipated audience. Sometimes this rehearsal is deliberate and noticeable (as when we prepare for a job interview or a public speaking engagement); other times it is automatic and almost imperceptible (as when we mindlessly check our hair in the mirror before stepping out the front door). Self-presentation is not only a prevalent aspect of our lives, it is also a very important one. Our success at leading others to believe we possess various characteristics has a profound influence on our outcomes in life ( Hogan & Briggs, 1986 ). Who we marry, who our friends are, whether we get ahead at work, and many other outcomes depend, to a great extent, on our ability to convince people that we are worthy of their love, their friendship, their trust, and their respect. Undoubtedly, this need to create a positive impression is one reason that people spend billions of dollars a year on cosmetics and other personal-appearance products.
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