Alfred Prufrock - Cason 1 Andrew Cason English 205-04 Essay...

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Cason 1 Andrew Cason English 205-04 Essay Two Prof. Bunch April 9, 2008 Alfred Prufrock I thoroughly enjoy reading T.S. Eliot’s poem, “The Love Song of Alfred Prufrock” because I could relate to the speaker’s feelings of existential angst. I share the same sense of confusion, doubt and isolation that the speaker expresses through his (or maybe her) figurative language and allusions. Eliot’s speaker accomplishes a sympathy and understanding within the reader of a character that is distressed concerning the fundamental questions about life, love and meaning. The poem begins with the voice inviting us to “Let us go then, you and I.” It sets up the poem as dramatic monologue where the speaker will pore out his deep seeded angst. The invitation, or maybe a command, is to go “through certain half deserted streets.” These ‘certain’ streets, the speaker states “follow like a tedious argument” that leads one to “an overwhelming question.” His association of the streets with a “tedious argument” which might suggest that the streets like our thoughts and deep thinking leads us to these overwhelming and abstract questions that are not very pleasant. Questions
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Alfred Prufrock - Cason 1 Andrew Cason English 205-04 Essay...

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