lecture09 - Astronomy Picture of the Day Part of...

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Unformatted text preview: Astronomy Picture of the Day Part of Jupiter’s atmosphere, as seen by the New Horizons mission Announcements • Quiz on friday in discussion section. Please bring: • A scantron form F-288-PAR-L • A pencil • Calculators are not allowed. • The quiz will cover material from the ¡rst 2 weeks of class, including chapters 2 and 3. • 10 questions, 25 minutes (2nd half of discussion section) • You must take the quiz in the section that you’re registered for! No substitutions. The sun and the seasons • If the earth’s rotation axis were aligned perpendicular to the earth’s orbital plane around the sun, then the sun would always be on the celestial equator N S N S Earth’s location in June Earth’s location in December note- diagram is not drawn to scale! but the earth’s rotation axis isn’t aligned like this! The sun and the seasons • The earth’s rotation axis is tipped by 23.5 degrees! This means that the sun doesn’t stay on the celestial equator. N S N S Earth’s location in June Earth’s location in December c e l e s t i a l e q u a t o r c e l e s t i a l e q u a t o r The sun’s daily motion: summer • If we’re viewing the sun from Irvine: • In summer, the sun is north of the celestial equator • So, it spends more than 12 hours above the horizon N S N C P horizon S C P c e l e s t i a l e q u a t o r The sun’s daily motion: winter • In winter, the sun is south of the celestial equator • So, it spends less than 12 hours above the horizon N S N C P horizon S C P c e l e s t i a l e q u a t o r Spring and fall...
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2008 for the course PHYS 20A taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '02 term at UC Irvine.

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lecture09 - Astronomy Picture of the Day Part of...

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