Dracula Midterm Notes - Dracula Midterm Notes SLAVIC...

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Dracula Midterm Notes: SLAVIC PREHISTORY - Sources of study: Historical sources, archaeology, ethnography, and linguistics - Lot of emphasis on burial and worship of the dead - Carpathian Mountains: believed to be between Poland and the Ukraine. - 50-100 BC- worship of the trees, circular villages with walls. 1. Personal- lived jointly with elders, it was a Matriarchy (babushka) 2. Territorial- communal spaces, very shared 3. Economic- benefit of the whole, no one suffers more than the other - 476 AD- fall of Rome, no warfare until this point - First Slavic Migration 1. Collapse of the Roman Empire 2. Germanic Tribes moved west 3. Aware of better areas 4. Armed 5. Possible climate change (Volcanoes) - Second Slavic Migration 1. Urbanization 2. Cultural Identity Altered 3. Populated areas: Bulgaria, Kiev, Moravia (Three religions- Islam, Christianity, Paganism) Pagan Practice - Animinism, Shamanism 1. Numinous Place - Unexplainable location, meaning placed (ex. Lighting tree) 2. Soothsayer: someone to interpret that numinous place (volkhv) 3. Spiritual forces: special force direction action (ie. Spirits) 4. Gods (Gods to control things. Ex. Perun- sky god) Kievan Rus’ - Converted to Orthodox Christianity- no writing system yet - Cyril and Methodius: Glagolitic, converted to Cyrillic - They replaced their Pagan gods with Christian saints Demons: - Domovoi- House spirit - Leshii- Forest spirit - Rusalka- restless dead corpse of a young girl (First female vamp counterpart?) TRANSMISSION OF LORE Lore: something that is taught or learned- knowledge gained through study and experience.
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- Helps to establish solidity and consistency (ex. Myth, art, folklore, architecture) - Lore helps to confront chaos and shape reality - Provides a reserve of knowledge for future generations - Ex. Monacan pine needles for scurvy - Broniswav Malinowsky: three spheres of coping: Science, magic, religion o Living in a tangible world affected by culture and lifestyle. This is affected by available resources, which leads to the 3 spheres of coping which can be sacred or profane. o Sacred: dealing with religion o Profane: dealing with science and magic 1. Science: accumulated verification of knowledge 2. Religion: process/value oriented- when science reaches a boundary, need something to explain it 3. Magic: end oriented manipulation, prediction of control - Ritual Development Theory 1. Primary Anxiety: when science no longer explains something 2. Primary Ritual: a random action occurs, repetition of process 3. Secondary Anxiety: occurs again despite primary ritual 4. Secondary Ritual: altered first ritual 5. Rationalization: interpret results 6. Symbolization: anxiety of chaos is removed 7. Function: creation and attribution to gods - ex. When people die, it was believed they came back for 30-40 days after death. There would be a day to venerate the dead, and replace blood sacrifice with alcohol - ORIGINS OF MYTH 1. Sacred history/ world origins 2. Nonhuman/partially human character 3. Past 4. Not necessarily true 5. Connected to ritual, usually true and symbolic - Mythology: the study of myth, with a focus on a particular group or culture - Upper vs. Lower: heavens vs. earth and gell
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