Comparative Politics Midterm Study Guide - Comparative...

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Comparative Politics Cumulative Final Study Guide Why and How Do We Compare? comparative politics—the systematic search for answers to political questions about how people around the world make and contest authoritative public choices method of agreement—comparing countries with different characteristics but similar outcomes method of difference—comparing countries with similar characteristics but dissimilar outcomes correlation—a mutual relationship or connection between two or more things causality—the relationship between a cause and effect The State and Its Formation state—a nation or territory considered as an organized political community under one government sovereignty—responsibility for the authority over a territory; a monopoly over legitimate force used in a territory state-building—it describes the construction of a functioning state neo-patrimonialism— is a system of social hierarchy where patrons use state resources in order to secure the loyalty of clients in the general population. patrimonial authority—government rules based on personal ties (clans/ tribes deliver goods to members) bureaucratic-rational state—predetermined rules, meritocratic bureaucracy, autonomous government officials from society State Formation, Failure and Phantom States weak/failed state—lack scope, strength, rule of law, effectiveness, autonomy, legitimacy phantom state—territories that are part of a state that want independence; they have internal sovereignty but not external sovereignty Social Forces and Collective Action collective action—an organized group that is purposeful and separate from the state social movement—a form of collective action that is organized with sustained action, with collective claims and goals civil society—collectively organized groups independent from the state, including interest groups and social movements social capital—the networks of relationships among people who live and work in a particular society, enabling that society to function effectively Nationalism nation—a cultural grouping of individuals who associate with each other based on collective held political identity state—the governing body over a territory
nationalism—group that wants to remain autonomous from the state nation-state—a state encompassing one dominant nation that is claims to embody and represent o Does not mean only one nation is present ethnic nationalism—nationalism for towards an ethnicity- attributes, social institutions that make groups different civic nationalism—based on political principals secession(ism)—attempt by some national minority to exercise self determination irredentism—when a nation or group claims territory that lies within another state; when a neighboring nation absorbs a territory from another state due to commonality in culture and language

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