ancient greek art

ancient greek art - Son 1 Ancient Greek Art: Analysis and...

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Son 1 Ancient Greek Art: Analysis and Comparison The Ancient Greeks placed great pride in their aesthetics. The artifacts that remain today testify to the unparalleled designs and elegant precision of the era. Though some artwork, such as statues, were produced to entertain the people and to revere the gods of the period, pottery, such as the amphoras and pelikes, served also a functional purpose as well as an aesthetic purpose. Many of the depictions on the jars often times represent mythical characters or Greek gods. Although many of these potteries share similar characteristics, the styles vary according to the major periods of Greek art in which each artwork was created. Specifically, by implementing the formal elements of art, Herakles Strangling the Nemean Lion created by Psiax in the early mid sixth century (illustrated in the book) and Apollo and Artemis Pouring Libation at Altar created by a painter near the Chicago Painter in the mid fifth century (available at the Metropolitan Museum of Arts), it is possible to differentiate between specific differences and similarities. Though seemingly the simplest element, lines compiled together create the skeletal outline as well as the direction of the artwork. In both Herakles Strangling the Nemean Lion and Apollo and Artemis Pouring Libation at Altar , lines on the gowns of Athena, and Apollo and Artemis create a sense movement on their robes respectively. In Herakles Strangling the Nemean Lion , the muscular contours of the lion and himself are visible through the incisions made directly on the amphora. Likewise, in Apollo and Artemis Pouring Libation at Altar , the more exaggerated contours on Apollo’s arm illustrate a more manly build as opposed to Artemis’s arms composed of more slender, soft lines. The curly lines utilized in Apollo’s hair create the illusion of texture. The same technique is implemented on Herakle’s hair and beard.
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ancient greek art - Son 1 Ancient Greek Art: Analysis and...

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