Study Questions 3-2

Study Questions 3-2 - hread Question 1 Post RE:RE:Question 1 Author David Schultz Date Sunday Status Published Overall rating Not rated Good answer

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Unformatted text preview: hread: Question 1 Post: RE:RE:Question 1 Author: David Schultz Date: Sunday, April 29, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Good answer. Any size other than very, very large is likely to lead to sampling error from one generation to the next and cause the population's allele frequencies to change from one generation to the next. Grade: 5 Thread: Question 1 Post: RE:Question 1 Author: Jacob Daigle Date: Friday, April 27, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated The population must be very large to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium because the calculations are made in terms of probabilities. If the number of events is finite, the actual outcome is likely to deviate, purely by chance, from the predicted outcome. For example, if someone were to toss an infinite number of unbiased coins, probability theory says that half will come up heads, but if only 100 coins were tossed, it is not likely that exactly 50 coins facing heads would be obtained, purely by chance. So, the larger the population, the greater the chance that the calculated Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium will be accurate. Thread: Question 1 Post: Question 1 Author: David Schultz Date: Thursday, April 26, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Why does a population have to be very large to be in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium? Thread: Question 2 Post: RE:RE:Question 2 Author: David Schultz Date: Monday, April 30, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated OK. Grade: 5 Thread: Question 2 Post: RE:Question 2 Author: Thomas Duvic Date: Monday, April 30, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Through natural selection the genetic variation can be reduced by the selection against a dominant or recessive phenotype which will remove the deleterious alleles from the population or at least reduce their frequencies to very low levels. Inbreeding, the mating of close relatives, can reduce the genetic variation in a population by heterozygote deficiency, F(the inbreeding coefficient) = H o (expected frequency of heterozygotes) - H(observed frequency) / H o . This is only if inbreeding is the cause heterozygote deficiency, F will be nearly the same for all genes. Genetic drift is a random process and can cause a reduction in the variation by the random fluctuation of alleles that results in the loss of this allele from the population. The lost alleles do not affect the fitness of the population, thus the one remaining is then fixed in the population. Thread: Question 2 Post: Question 2 Author: David Schultz Date: Thursday, April 26, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Genetic variation in a population may be reduced through selection, inbreeding, or genetic drift. Describe how each process can result in a reduction in genetic variation in a population....
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course BIOL 101 taught by Professor Kilgen during the Spring '08 term at Nicholls State.

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Study Questions 3-2 - hread Question 1 Post RE:RE:Question 1 Author David Schultz Date Sunday Status Published Overall rating Not rated Good answer

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