Selfish Gene Question Set 4

Selfish Gene Question Set 4 - EVOLUTION AND ECOLOGY...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: EVOLUTION AND ECOLOGY > DISCUSSION BOARD > SELFISH GENE QUESTION SET 4 > COLLECTION Collection:Selfish Gene Question Set 4 Print Sort by Filter Author Status Published Thread: Question 1 Post: RE:RE:Question 1 Author: David Schultz Date: Wednesday, March 28, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Good examples. Grade: 5 Thread: Question 1 Post: RE:Question 1 Author: Desirae Barrios Date: Monday, March 26, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Humans are an obvious example of a social species whose genes benefit more from association than they put in. Humans have set up a system where an individual contributes one skill (a job) and benefits from a multitude of skills contributed by others. So rather than each individual having to hunt and butcher his own food, make all his own clothing, etc., needs are met by group contribution. An individual in this system has much more to gain in saved time and energy than he puts out. A more contemporary example would be dolphins, which swim in groups. This affords them more protection, as a group of several dolphins is much more formidable to potential predators than an individual. Dolphin pods have also been noted to aid their sick, injured, or young fellows. The individual gains more from the combined contribution of his group than he puts into it. Thread: Question 1 Post: Question 1 Date: Monday, March 26, 2007 Author: David Schultz Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Dawkins states (p. 166) If animals live in groups their genes must get more benefit out of the association than they put in." Give an example (not one given by Dawkins) of a social animal and describe the benefits that group living gives to genes of group members. Thread: Question 2 Post: RE:RE:Question 2 Author: David Schultz Date: Friday, March 30, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Grade: 5 Thread: Question 2 Post: RE:Question 2 Author: Rachel Laird Date: Thursday, March 29, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated A 'model' to best express Hamilton's theory of a "selfish-herd" is the concern of a large group of animals avoiding predation. It is to a predator's benefit to pick off the weakest and nearest prey, this is obviously consequential to the prey. "...[If] the prey animals start by being randomly dispersed, the selfish urge of each individual will be to reduce his domain of danger by trying to position himself in a gap between other individuals" (pp 168). Therefore, it is the prey's perogative to avoid being nearest to the predator. Thread: Question 2 Post: Question 2 Author: David Schultz Date: Monday, March 26, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Why would Hamilton refer to a group of animals as a selfish herd? Thread: Question 3 Post: RE:RE:Question 3 Author: David Schultz Date: Monday, March 26, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Grade: 5 Thread: Question 3 Post: RE:Question 3 Author: Tayla Guidry Date: Monday, March 26, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating:...
View Full Document

Page1 / 48

Selfish Gene Question Set 4 - EVOLUTION AND ECOLOGY...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online