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Study Questions 3-1 - 3.1 Thread:Question 1...

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3.1 Thread: Question 1 Post: RE:Question 1 Author: Renee Bourgeois Date: Tuesday, April 24, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated H= 0.33 D= f(Aa)= 0.33 R= f(aa)= 0.33 frequency of dominant allele: p=D+(H/2)= 0.33+(0.33/2)= 0.5 frequency of recessive allele: q= R+(H/2)= 0.33+(0.33/2)= 0.5 expected frequency of heterozygote: f(Aa)= 2pq=2*0.5*0.5=0.5=Ho Inbreeding coefficient: F= (Ho-H)/Ho= (0.5-0.33)/0.5= 0.34 Thread: Question 1 Post: Question 1 Author: David Schultz Date: Monday, April 23, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated For a single gene with 2 alleles, A and a, the frequency of 3 genotypes in a population is 0.33, 0.33, and 0.33. What is the inbreeding coefficient for this population? Thread: Question 2 Post: RE:RE:Question 2 Author: David Schultz Date: Tuesday, April 24, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Grade: 5 Thread: Question 2 Post: RE:Question 2 Author: Jennifer Blanchard Date: Monday, April 23, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated F = (H 0 - H) / H 0
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F = (0.5-0.5) / 0.5 The inbreeding coefficient for this population is 0. Thread: Question 2 Post: Question 2 Author: David Schultz Date: Monday, April 23, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated For a single gene with 2 alleles, A and a, the frequency of 3 genotypes in a population is f(AA) = 0.25, f(Aa) = 0.5, and f(aa) = 0.25. What is the inbreeding coefficient for this population? Thread: Question 3 Post: RE:RE:Question 3 Author: David Schultz Date: Sunday, April 29, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated OK. In general, you'd look for a decrease in offspring viability or fertility relative to some reference population that is not inbreeding. Grade: 1 Thread: Question 3 Post: RE:RE:RE:RE:Question 3 Author: David Schultz Date: Sunday, April 29, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated This is part of the answer. You tell how to identify a population that is inbreeding. After you do that, how would you know if it suffers from inbreeding depression? Grade: 1 Thread: Question 3 Post: RE:Question 3 Author: Shawanda Robertson Date: Thursday, April 26, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated You would know you have an inbreeding population if you have a species of snakes who have a low viability rate and you were to reintroduce them to partners outside their mating population and then all of a sudden the viablity increased again due to the deleterious alleles becoming masked again.
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Thread: Question 3 Post: RE:RE:RE:Question 3 Author: Gretchen Himel Date: Thursday, April 26, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Inbreeding depression is reduced fitness in a given population as a result of breeding of related individuals, which leads to a greater expression of deleterious recessive alleles. Inbreeding results in offspring of lower fitness. Inbreeding can be detected by examining genotypic frequencies. Inbreeding increases the frequency of homozygous genotypes and decreases the frequency of heterozygotes. Mating between relatives "unmasks" the effects of recessive deleterious alleles that would otherwise occur only in heterozygous individuals.
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