Study Questions 3-1

Study Questions 3-1 - 3.1 Thread:Question 1...

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3.1 Thread: Question 1 Post: RE:Question 1 Author: Renee Bourgeois Date: Tuesday, April 24, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated H= 0.33 D= f(Aa)= 0.33 R= f(aa)= 0.33 frequency of dominant allele: p=D+(H/2)= 0.33+(0.33/2)= 0.5 frequency of recessive allele: q= R+(H/2)= 0.33+(0.33/2)= 0.5 expected frequency of heterozygote: f(Aa)= 2pq=2*0.5*0.5=0.5=Ho Inbreeding coefficient: F= (Ho-H)/Ho= (0.5-0.33)/0.5= 0.34 Thread: Question 1 Post: Question 1 Author: David Schultz Date: Monday, April 23, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated For a single gene with 2 alleles, A and a, the frequency of 3 genotypes in a population is 0.33, 0.33, and 0.33. What is the inbreeding coefficient for this population? Thread: Question 2 Post: RE:RE:Question 2 Author: David Schultz Date: Tuesday, April 24, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Grade: 5 Thread: Question 2 Post: RE:Question 2 Author: Jennifer Blanchard Date: Monday, April 23, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated F = (H 0 - H) / H 0
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F = (0.5-0.5) / 0.5 The inbreeding coefficient for this population is 0. Thread: Question 2 Post: Question 2 Author: David Schultz Date: Monday, April 23, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated For a single gene with 2 alleles, A and a, the frequency of 3 genotypes in a population is f(AA) = 0.25, f(Aa) = 0.5, and f(aa) = 0.25. What is the inbreeding coefficient for this population? Thread: Question 3 Post: RE:RE:Question 3 Author: David Schultz Date: Sunday, April 29, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated OK. In general, you'd look for a decrease in offspring viability or fertility relative to some reference population that is not inbreeding. Grade: 1 Thread: Question 3 Post: RE:RE:RE:RE:Question 3 Author: David Schultz Date: Sunday, April 29, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated This is part of the answer. You tell how to identify a population that is inbreeding. After you do that, how would you know if it suffers from inbreeding depression? Grade: 1 Thread: Question 3 Post: RE:Question 3 Author: Shawanda Robertson Date: Thursday, April 26, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated You would know you have an inbreeding population if you have a species of snakes who have a low viability rate and you were to reintroduce them to partners outside their mating population and then all of a sudden the viablity increased again due to the deleterious alleles becoming masked again.
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Thread: Question 3 Post: RE:RE:RE:Question 3 Author: Gretchen Himel Date: Thursday, April 26, 2007 Status: Published Overall rating: Not rated Inbreeding depression is reduced fitness in a given population as a result of breeding of related individuals, which leads to a greater expression of deleterious recessive alleles. Inbreeding results in offspring of lower fitness. Inbreeding can be detected by
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2008 for the course BIOL 101 taught by Professor Kilgen during the Spring '08 term at Nicholls State.

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Study Questions 3-1 - 3.1 Thread:Question 1...

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