psyc_vocab_2 - Chapter 5 Learning: How We're Changed by...

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Chapter 5 – Learning: How We’re Changed by Experience learning : any relatively permanent change in behavior (or behavior potential) resulting from experience classical conditioning : a basic form of learning in which one stimulus comes to serve as a signal for the occurrence of a second stimulus. during classing conditioning, organisms acquire information about the relations between various stimuli, not simple associations between them stimulus : a physical event capable of affecting behavior unconditioned stimulus (USC) : in classical conditioning, a stimulus that can evoke an unconditioned response the first time it is presented unconditioned response (UCR) : in classical conditioning, the response evoked by an unconditioned stimulus conditioned stimulus (CS) : in classical conditioning, the stimulus that is repeatedly paired with an unconditioned stimulus conditioned response (CR) : in classical conditioning, the response to the conditioned stimulus acquisition : the process by which a conditioned stimulus acquires the ability to elicit a conditioned response through repeated pairings of an unconditioned stimulus with a conditioned stimulus delay conditioning : a form of forward conditioning in which the onset of the unconditioned stimulus begins while the conditioned stimulus is still present trace conditioning : a form of forward conditioning in which the onset of the conditioned stimulus precedes the onset of the unconditioned stimulus and the presentation of the CS and UCS does not overlap simultaneous conditioning : a form of conditioning in which the conditioned stimulus and the unconditioned stimulus begin and end at the same time backward conditioning : a type of conditioning in which the presentation of the unconditioned stimulus precedes the presentation of the conditioned stimulus extinction : the process through which a conditioned stimulus gradually loses the ability to evoke conditioned responses when it is no longer followed by the unconditioned stimulus reconditioning : the rapid recovery of a conditioned response to a CS-UCS pairing following extinction spontaneous recovery : following extinction, reinstatement of conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus pairings will produce a conditioned response stimulus generalization : the tendency of stimuli similar to a conditioned stimulus to evoke conditioned responses stimulus discrimination : the process by which organisms learn to respond to certain stimuli but not to others
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biological constraints on learning : refers to how all forms of conditioning are not equally easy to establish with all organisms conditioned taste aversion : a type of conditioning in which the UCS (usually internal cues associated with nausea or vomiting) occurs several hours after the CS (often a novel food) leading to a strong CS- UCS association in a single trial phobia : an irrational conditioned fear of some object or event
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2008 for the course PSYC 1010 taught by Professor Hubble during the Spring '08 term at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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psyc_vocab_2 - Chapter 5 Learning: How We're Changed by...

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