Chapter 7 - UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS School of...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS School of Merchandising and Hospitality Management SMHM 4300 Survey of Beverages Spring 2006 (7) CLASS NOTES: How to Read Wine Labels Before the 20th century, when bottles were not used for shipping wines, restaurants would buy wines in casks, and bottle the wine on premises. The restaurateur would print the labels, including the name of the wine, and as a guarantee to the guest, the owner/manager of the establishment would sign the label. Throughout the world, there are four main methods in naming wines. Wineries use either varietal (i.e. a grape type), place name, generic names or proprietary names. The difference between Old World (Europe) wines and New World (the rest of the world) wine, in broad terms is this: The Europeans name their wines with the place where the grapes were grown, for example Bordeaux. The rest of the world generally names their wines by the name of the predominant grape used, for example Pinot Noir. There are many refinements to this statement. In the case of the famous wine regions of Europe, it is possible to make direct connections from a place name to a grape type name. This is because the wine production laws of many nations stipulate that a specific grape must be used to make a wine if a place name appears on the label, as for example if the red wine claims to be from Burgundy it must be 100% Pinot Noir. Wine labels can be very colorful and provide necessary information to the consumer. Sometimes, wine labels may be misleading. A well-designed label should be simple, clear to read, and not contain superfluous or misleading information. In some cases, in order not to reprint new labels every year, the winery may decide to have a separate vintage label identifying the year and put this on the neck of the bottle. What you read on a USA wine label is the tip of the iceberg of a
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
maze of regulations which involve both the federal and states government. Because the federal government collects taxes on wine at its source of production the winery must show on the label the alcohol content of the wine the taxes on each bottle are based on this factor. The higher the alcohol contents the higher the taxes. Sparkling wine taxes are nearly 3 times as high as the taxes on table/still wines. Furthermore the federal government is concerned about the health and safety of our citizens. Therefore the winery is required to state that wines contain sulfites (except in organic wines) and that consumption of wines may affect the health and safety of those consuming them. The BATF enforces the label requirements through a system of label approval process. A winery or an importer must obtain approval of the label for a wine, before the wine is sold or removed from customs, as in the case of imported wines.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern