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Lecture__10_�_Monroe_&_Jackson_�_Issues_Foreign_&_Domestic_in_the_Early_19th

Lecture__10_�_Monroe_&_Jackson_�_Issues_Foreign_&_Domestic_in_the_Early_19th

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Lecture #10 – Monroe & Jackson – Issues Foreign & Domestic in the Early 19 th Century Introduction A. The 1800s were an important turning point – bridge between early national and antebellum eras B. As US solidified its territory the following decades witnessed major conflict over the role of government and the country’s economic destiny. I. Issues Foreign….The Monroe Doctrine (1823) A. The Question What happens when the revolt breaks out in Latin America? How does the new nation of America react when foreign powers from England come to be a threat to them? B. The Response Monroe declares neutrality over the Latin America and Spain disagreement In 1821 America receives Florida from Spain The US then decides to support Latin America in the conflict, solely for economic reasons (including inquiring new trade routes). European countries get upset with the US stance on the issue. C. The Result The Monroe Doctrine – forbids Europeans from colonizing in the American hemisphere; and in turn America agreed to stay out of disagreements in the European hemisphere II. And Domestic….The Jacksonian Presidency A. Political Context of the 1820s 1. Rise of universal white male suffrage This means that not only property owning white males are able to vote, but also poor white men. This makes elections more contested and also more popular. 2. End of the “Era of Good Feelings” This begins with the Missouri Compromise. 3. The election of 1828 John Quincy Adams vs. Andrew Jackson B. Rise of Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson wins the election by a narrow margin. This is a turning point towards the era of common man. 1. Jackson’s Philosophy Presented himself as a man of the people (very common) even though he was really elite. Independence and individualism Policies of expansion at any cost, this promotion of westward expansion appealed to farmers 2. The Contradiction He was fiercely loyal to the Democratic Party and to the elite who supported him both financially and through endorsing him. His other side
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